Aimster going the way of Napster

Even a change of name can't throw the record labels off the scent...

Even a change of name can't throw the record labels off the scent...

The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) has won another major battle in its ongoing war against file sharing and illegal music downloading. The US District Court of Chicago has slapped a preliminary injunction on Madster, formerly known as Aimster, which means it can continue operating for the time being, but may have to accept significant changes to the service suggested by the industry. The record companies now have one week to come up with the proposals for how the service can keep going without infringing any copyrights. Chief Judge Marvin Aspen added that any final proposals the record companies come up with should be tailored to ensure "non-infringing" users of Madster are able to continue. The RIAA levelled used similar tactics against Napster, which it was successful in closing down, claiming the illegal sharing of copyrighted materials had hit CD sales and artist royalties. Madster is no stranger to legal wrangling. Its rebranding from Aimster was enforced after AOL claimed its domain name infringed the copyright of its AOL Instant Messenger (AIM) service.