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Alcoa launches carbon capture pilot

Alcoa will launch a pilot program with Codexis and CO2 Solution in an effort to capture carbon emissions, neutralize the material and then turn it into a commercial product.
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Written by Larry Dignan, Contributing Editor on

Alcoa will launch a pilot program with Codexis and CO2 Solution in an effort to capture carbon emissions, neutralize the material and then turn it into a commercial product.

The effort, funded by Alcoa and $13.5 million from the U.S. Department of Energy, will go like this:

  • Alcoa will use in-duct scrubber technology to capture emissions.
  • The work with Codexis and CO2 Solution will revolve around treating and utilizing alkaline clay, or bauxite residue, and other residuals. These byproducts come from the aluminum manufacturing process.
  • These parties will test a scrubbing process that combines flue gas, enzymes and alkaline clay to create a neutralized product that could be used in environmental reclamation projects.

According to Alcoa the project will go on for three years with an investigation phase through December. From there, the project will become a pilot.

For Alcoa, the carbon capture pilot is part of a larger sustainability push. There's also a profit motive too assuming Alcoa can ultimately commercialize its findings and manufacturing byproducts.

This post was originally published on Smartplanet.com

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