AMD pushes reset on environmental goals

Just received a heads-up that chip-maker Advanced Micro Devices has updated some of its environmental and corporate sustainability initiatives based, in part, on the fact that the activity in its baseline year, 2009, was much lower than normal. The reason that AMD reset its goals back in that year was because it sold off most of its manufacturing operation to Global Foundries, which obviously had an impact on its footprint.

Just received a heads-up that chip-maker Advanced Micro Devices has updated some of its environmental and corporate sustainability initiatives based, in part, on the fact that the activity in its baseline year, 2009, was much lower than normal. The reason that AMD reset its goals back in that year was because it sold off most of its manufacturing operation to Global Foundries, which obviously had an impact on its footprint. In short, the greenhouse gas emissions associated with that year were lower than normal.

In a blog post on Feb. 14, AMD global sustainability manager Justin Murrill, says that AMD's new goal for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions is 5 percent between 2009 and 2014. That includes Scope 1 and Scope 2 emissions. Currently, it is evaluating Scope 3 emissions (the stuff associated with supply chain and business partners), but it hasn't taken any specific action.

Murrill writes:

"Our strategy for achieving these GHG goals is to first directly reduce our carbon footprint through energy conservation projects and efficiency improvements. As part of this effort, we will enhance our employee engagement program, Go Green, to involve our workforce in conservation efforts. We will also evaluate renewable energy options including generating energy onsite from solar panels, purchasing green energy from utility providers and purchasing renewable energy credits."

Now would be a good to remind readers that Intel is currently the top green power purchaser in the United States.

AMD has also reestablished its water usage reduction goals, now focusing on a 20 percent reduction by 2014, based on 2009 levels. It will focus more closely on per-employee and per-unit measures, which in my mind are more accurate measures of sustainable business practices than actual usage, anyway.

The chip-maker's new solid waste reduction goal calls for it to divert 70 percent of its overall waste from landfills. It will look more carefully at "upstream" opportunities, new revenue streams that it might build even as it reduces what it "throws out."