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Anti-P2P language likely to stay in higher ed bill

News.com reports that language that would require universities to send off money to the Napster or Ruckus music subscription services if they can't stem P2P filesharing on campus is unlikely to be changed before a House vote on the measure.

News.com reports that language that would require universities to send off money to the Napster or Ruckus music subscription services if they can't stem P2P filesharing on campus is unlikely to be changed before a House vote on the measure.
Debate on a massive Democratic-sponsored higher education spending bill (PDF) began around 1:30 a.m. ET and continued late into the evening on Wednesday. But no amendments were expected to be introduced to change the antipiracy sections embedded in the 747-page text.

House Education and Labor Committee aides said final votes on the amendments and the entire bill are expected to begin at 9:45 a.m. ET Thursday.

As I noted last week, the bill would would not only require universities to install anti-piracy deterrent technology but also require them to pay for monthly subscription fees to Ruckus and Napster. A really outrageous aspect of this is that it would pull federal student loan funding from students at schools that don't comply, thus even totally law-abiding students could be terribly hurt by the rule.