Broadband piece was 6th most read on open source blog

It is ironic that falling costs may actually be behind the mess. Any equipment for speeding last-mile links may become obsolete before it's paid for, and investors don't like those odds.

A rant I wrote on the U.S. broadband crisis, highlighting an e-book by Bruce Kushnick, was the 6th most popular item on this blog during 2006. (Image from The Wireless Report.)

The issues involved became central background to two big debates in 2006, the AT&T-BellSouth merger and network neutrality. Despite intense debate and great public support, Bell opponents failed to stop the monopolists in either case. The merger will likely go through early next year, and the law now allows Bell companies to blackmail site operators.

The central problem remains. The U.S. continues to fall behind in broadband, burdened by a duopoly which hoards bits from users despite falling costs for equipment. The central answer also remains, competition. But the amount of competition in this space actually fell in 2006.

It is ironic that falling costs may actually be behind the mess. Any equipment for speeding last-mile links may become obsolete before it's paid for, and investors don't like those odds.

There has been a lot of talk about 802.11 wireless service, about WiMax, about broadband over power lines, and about opening up more unregulated spectrum. But nothing has happened. I could probably repeat that January item verbatim, and it would be just as relevant now as it was then.

Sort of coal in the Christmas stocking, but a fine target for your New Years' Resolutions.

 

 

Next up: The fifth most-read story -- Project List
Previous: The seventh most-read story -- Coverity