'

Broadcasters fume as FCC moves forward on white spaces

We won't have nationwide wireless without a fight. The National Association of Broadcasters came out swinging against the FCC report passing white spaces devices.

We won't have nationwide wireless without a fight. The National Association of Broadcasters came out swinging against the FCC report passing white spaces devices.

"It would appear that the FCC is misinterpreting the actual data collected by their own engineers," said NAB Executive Vice President Dennis Wharton. "Any reasonable analysis of the OET report would conclude that unlicensed devices that rely solely on spectrum sensing threaten the viability of clear television reception. Basing public policy on an imprecise Cliffs Notes version of a 149-page report raises troubling questions." (via InternetNews.com)
But on a conference call pulled together by the Wireless Innovation Alliance, Philips said they are moving forward with development.
"Development plans are ready to get devices up within a year and a fair amount of new technologies," Philips research staffer Monica Ghost said.

Microsoft released this statement:

The FCC has now crossed an important milestone in the path to establishing final rules of the road for the use of the white spaces. Clearly the FCC’s internal work and its test process has provided enough information, guidance and technical input to move the process forward in allowing unlicensed use of the white spaces. We are pleased that the FCC and Chairman Martin plan to soon vote on this important matter. We urge the Commissioners to come to a decision quickly and adopt rules that will allow all Americans to realize the full and enormous potential white spaces have to expand broadband access in underserved, urban, and rural areas and to enable a new wave of innovation and Internet services and products.

Ben Scott of Free Press:

The real value of unlicensed white spaces isn't in the devices of today -- it's in their future potential to connect all Americans to a fast, affordable, open Internet. Freeing up these powerful airwaves will create a boom in innovative technologies and expand the opportunities for citizens to communicate with one another and the rest of the world.

The next step is a "report and order," currently being drafted and set for a vote on Nov. 4. If it passes that will be two encouraging votes in one day.