BYOD and productivity: does 'bring your own device' help or hurt?

'If you don't define your BYOD objectives and supporting policies and processes, your end users will do it for you – but not with your company's security, data loss prevention and compliance requirements in mind.'

Smartphones, tablets and other devices represent an unstoppable wave of technology that employees are bringing to work themselves. It represents great opportunities for connectivity and productivity, without companies having to foot the bill for the hardware, or IT having to get involved in installation and maintenance.  Win-win? Perhaps -- at the same time, all these undocumented devices create potential headaches for IT, and for companies.

every company needs to create or adopt a set of BYOD objectives, policies and supporting processes, to keep security and manageability in check. "If you don't define your BYOD objectives and supporting policies and processes, your end users will do it for you – but not with your company's security, data loss prevention and compliance requirements in mind."

He says every good BYOD policy should have the following elements:

Respect enterprise data integrity without diminishing employee privacy or personal productivity. "To maintain the delicate balance between the personal experience users now demand and the security and compliance companies require, your mobile security and management solution should 'containerize' enterprise data."

Maintain consistent, centralized control. "Every company today needs a centralized management platform that allows administrators to control data access and prevent data loss at both the application and device level."

Get global visibility to prevent rogue device network access. "Without visibility into all the devices on the network, IT simply can't ensure the integrity of corporate data."

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