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Calling all security experts: Uncle Sam needs you

The government is hungry for computer security experts, and the private sector is likely also to feel the pinch.
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Written by Joe McKendrick, Contributor on

The University of Texas at San Antonio announced it has just received $1.25 Million from the National Science Foundation for a scholarship program to support cyber security students.

“Ninety-nine percent of the students who go through this program find immediate placement in federal jobs following graduation,” said Kleanthis Psarris, professor and chair of the UTSA Department of Computer Science, who will oversee the program and its graduates.

The government is hungry for computer security experts, and students in the program go on to work for the FBI, CIA or Department of Defense, or local agencies.  The fact that grant money is seeding these programs suggest that critical shortages are on the way for this talent -- no doubt in the private sector as well.

Dice, the online IT recruiting site, reports that among 68,000 available positions this month, demand for information security skills has doubled over the past year (+109% to 1,680). "Employers frequently look for candidates who have earned the Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) which is requested in a third of IS job postings. Candidates for the CISSP must have at least five years of experience in information security."

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