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CEA, EDF seeking CRT recycling ideas

Because CRT glass contains lead, the glass recovered from old monitors can't be used in traditional glass-to-glass applications.
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Written by Heather Clancy, Contributor on

Have an idea about what to do with all the glass in obsolete cathode ray tubes? The Consumer Electronics Association and Environmental Defense Fund want to hear about it.

The two organizations are running an Eco-Challenge to encourage the submission of ideas for how lead-heavy glass can be recycled or reused more responsible as people ditch CRTs in favor of more energy-efficient, less toxic LCDs and plasma displays.

The reason this issue is a challenge is because now that CRTs are, for all intents and purposes, obsolete, the recycling industry that had cropped up to handle recycling them has virtually disappeared. But the CEA and EDF believe that more than 1 billion pounds of legacy CRT televisions and monitors will enter the electronic waste stream over the decade. What to do with all that stuff?

The Eco-Challenge seeks to find an economically and environmentally viable solution to this dilemma -- one that can be shared across the ecosystem of technology manufacturers, retailers and recyclers. (In other words, if you want to keep your idea proprietary and close to the vest, you need not apply.)

CEA and EDF will pay $5,000 for the winning solution.

The deadline for the contest is Dec. 11, 2011.

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