CryptCard to protect notebook users

As an active encryption system with its own CPU, CryptCard prevents unauthorized access to the notebook and facilitates online hard disk encryption

As an active encryption system with its own CPU, CryptCard prevents unauthorized access to the notebook and facilitates online hard disk encryption.

Germany-based IT security hardware vendor CE-Infosys has announced the release of CryptCard in Asia, a removable security device designed to protect data in notebooks.

CryptCard, which comes in the form of a PCMCIA Type II card, verifies notebook users prior to the operating system booting up. After installing CryptCard, the laptop requires users to insert the CryptCard (which stores special security keys) and input a password to boot up the computer.

The storage of these keys in CryptCard means that the user can physically remove them from the system, making it impossible for hackers to find the keys.

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CryptCard encrypts the entire hard disk of the laptop, including the operating systems. Therefore, even if the laptop gets stolen, and the hard disk is reconnected to another laptop, the encrypted data within the hard disk will remain undecipherable. Multiple operating systems can also co-exist on a single encrypted hard disk, allowing the flexibility of mixing unencrypted and encrypted partitions on the same hard disk.

The device, which also acts a key and certification storage for PKI applications, utilizes the Data Encryption Standard (DES) algorithm in CBC double key length mode (128 bits).

An optional IPCrypt Client Module is available. This module provides a secure VPN connection to a company's worldwide location via any kind of IP network. In such mobile applications, IP packets are encrypted and tunneled in the CryptCard using IPSec standards.

CE-Infosys has incorporated its high-speed encryption chip (encrypts at speeds in excess of 20 Mbytes/second) into the card.

The CryptCard is available for S$400, though prices will vary from region to region.

The company moved its R&D center to Singapore last year from Germany.

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