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Flood of municipal wastewater treatment projects predicted

Report from Lux Research suggests close to $28 billion could be spent on wastewater treatment technologies in 2012
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Written by Heather Clancy, Contributor on

How will cities around the world be able to process an additional 4.3 billion gallons of municipal wastewater daily?

A report about municipal wastewater technology by Lux Research suggests there could be up to $27.8 billion spent on upgrades and overhauls during 2012. Of that, more than $22.3 billion will be dedicated to projects in developed nations, according to "Sizing Up Advanced Municipal Wastewater Treatment." Given that reality, emerging technology for wastewater treatment better integrate well with existing infrastructure.

The focus of these projects? Lux Research predicts the following:

  • Approximately 55 percent of projects will involve urban replacement.
  • Niche technologies that offer easy to deploy solutions will be appealing. Specifically, Lux Research mentions three companies: Epuramat, which makes technology called Box4Water; Clearford, which makes a shallow-pipe treatment network; and SCFI, which makes industrial treatment technology.
  • The United States and China will represent the largest markets (little surprise here).
  • Two other companies that Lux Research is following closely are Aqwise and Entex, which both offer alternative approaches to the traditional method of using activated sludge for treatment processes

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