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GoDaddy faces customer complaints over SOPA

Some customers of internet domain registrar and web hosting company, GoDaddy have said they will stop using the company's services unless it withdraws its support for the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA).Ben Huh, chief executive of Cheezburger — known most notably for its sites 'I can has Cheezburger' and 'Fail Blog' — said he would shift more than a thousand domains away from GoDaddy unless it withdrew support for the bill.

Some customers of internet domain registrar and web hosting company, GoDaddy have said they will stop using the company's services unless it withdraws its support for the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA).

Ben Huh, chief executive of Cheezburger — known most notably for its sites 'I can has Cheezburger' and 'Fail Blog' — said he would shift more than a thousand domains away from GoDaddy unless it withdrew support for the bill.

"We will move our 1,000 domains off GoDaddy unless you drop support of SOPA. We love you guys, but SOPA-is-cancer to the Free Web," Huh , said on Twitter on Thursday.

Some smaller web-based companies have also said they will abandon the service unless it changes its position.

SOPA, which was introduced into the US House of Representatives at the end of October, would give US law enforcement the ability to force search engines, some DNS providers and other web services to effectively render certain websites 'invisible' to web users.

The bill is the latest culmination of major copyright holders attempts to clamp-down on online piracy and counterfeit goods via the legal system. It builds on the Protect IP Act, although it does vary with things such as the way in which it treats foreign websites, and strengthens its stance on the general-law used to prosecute not-for-profit copyright infringements.

"We have worked with the House Judiciary Committee to make changes we believe are necessary and have made attempts to work with the rest of the leaders in the internet ecosystem to ensure the final version of the bill is acceptable to everyone involved," Christine Jones, executive vice president of GoDaddy, said in a statement on Thursday.

"So, we will continue to work with Congress, our friends in the internet community, and intellectual property holders, to make progress on this extremely important issue," she added.