Google boosts Chrome App store: Angry Birds; Developers keep 95 percent of revenue

Google is stepping on the gas with its Chrome Web Store with the launch of Angry Birds, a 95 percent revenue split with developers and a global rollout in 41 countries to reach 160 million users.

Google is stepping on the gas with its Chrome Web Store with the launch of Angry Birds, a 95 percent revenue split with developers and a global rollout in 41 countries to reach 160 million users.

With the move, Google's Chrome browser strategy comes into more focus. Chrome is about generating search "lock-in" but usage too. The browser is becoming an app and Google is letting developers 95 percent of revenue to ensure the Chrome Web Store is dominant.

Apple's traditional split is 70 percent---and most similar efforts have followed that model. Google appears to be starting a price war for developer attention.

As a result the Chrome Web Store,  highlighted at the Google I/O conference Wednesday, is likely to get a lot more love. In addition, Angry Birds will be cached for offline usage. Google said its Web Store users have 2 times the interaction and 2.5 times transaction volume.

Google execs also demonstrated 3D applications and performance enhancements in the Chrome browser.

Add it up and Google is dangling multiple carrots---notably 95 percent of revenue---to generate more apps in its Web store.