Google patches six vulnerabilities in Chrome release

The latest stable version of Chrome, Google's web browser, was released on Thursday, with six security vulnerabilities patched.Each of the fixed vulnerabilities for the 10.

The latest stable version of Chrome, Google's web browser, was released on Thursday, with six security vulnerabilities patched.

Each of the fixed vulnerabilities for the 10.0.648.204 release of Chrome were classified as "high" by Google. The rating is the third most severe of Google's four-tiered system and is reserved for vulnerabilities that allow an attacker to read or modify data belonging to other websites and modify browser security features.

Two of them were use-after-free bugs, two were stale pointers, one was a Document Object Model (DOM) tree corruption and another was a buffer error in base string handling. Use-after-free and stale pointer vulnerabilities involve improper memory allocation and can potentially expose the user to attacks.

Additionally, two secure socket layer (SSL) certificates were blacklisted.

Google paid $8500 (£5,286) to three different researchers under its policy of paying researchers a bounty for finding and detailing the vulnerabilities.

The update also added support for password manager on Linux, when using the browser, along with performance and stability fixes.