HP discloses latest green policy progress

Day 3 of the high-tech corporate sustainability and environmental report deluge, following the disclosures by AMD and CA earlier this week. This one is a biggie: Hewlett-Packard.

Day 3 of the high-tech corporate sustainability and environmental report deluge, following the disclosures by AMD and CA earlier this week. This one is a biggie: Hewlett-Packard. As you might expect, there are oodles of statistics to ponder. Although, realistically, HP has been at this green IT and corporate sustainability thing for some time.

Here are a couple of the really positive ones from the 2010 Global Citizenship Report:

  • During 2010, the amount of carbon dioxide emissions that HP operations create was reduced by 9 percent over the previous year. The company's goal is to cut energy and greenhouse gas emissions from its operations by 20 percent by 2013, compared with its baseline set in 2005.
  • The company purchased twice as much renewable energy in 2010 as it did in the previous year.
  • It contributed to the recycling of 2.36 billion pounds (since 1987) of electronics products and supplies. In the last year alone, the HP recycling program collected about 266 million pounds of products, which included 70 million print cartridges.
  • Over the year, HP invested $11 million in energy efficiency projects that are expected to generate savings of about 70 million kilowatt-hours annually.

The not-so-great statistic is that HP's emissions related to employee travel were way up: a 49 percent increase related to air travel alone. I suppose one might expect this, because business travel across the high-tech industry picked up last year when the economy showed signs of recovery. SAP also stubbed its toe here when it reported some quarterly carbon dioxide emissions numbers last week.

But the revelation is disappointing nonetheless especially especially since Hewlett-Packard actually sells a line of telepresence technologies. How can tech companies expect other businesses to use their technologies to improve their green profile, when they aren't always using them internally. To be fair, HP says it is investing more in telepresence. The hiccup is also illustrative of how much more education is still needed at the grassroots level to get people supportive of new policies and behavior that might have an impact on corporate environmental strategy.

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