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IBM packages Linux bundle for developers

Singapore, 21 March 2000 - IBM yesterday announced the release of an IBM Linux Start-up bundle for developers, to go on the market for under S$10,000.The release is part of a several key initiatives to accelerate the adoption of Linux for businesses here in Singapore.

Singapore, 21 March 2000 - IBM yesterday announced the release of an IBM Linux Start-up bundle for developers, to go on the market for under S$10,000.

The release is part of a several key initiatives to accelerate the adoption of Linux for businesses here in Singapore.

Other initiatives include upcoming programmes to fuel the development of applications among independant software developers as well as students, and a slew of upcoming support line services to help ease the adoption of Linux for business.

At S$9,723, the Start-up bundle is targeted at either large businesses or independant application developers, to allow them to start building their applications for their various business needs.

The bundle includes the IBM Netfinity server 3500 with 14 inch monitor, the IBM Universal Database for Linux (1 server, 1 client license), the IBM Websphere Application server (1 server, 1 user license), as well as technical support for both software. The bundle comes with the Redhat Linux OS.

Most of the customers would not require assistance installing the OS, however IBM will do the installation for a fee of $188, said Koh Juh Ju, spokesperson for IBM Singapore.

Additionally, IBM is also embarking on programmes to encourage the local developing community to create new applications for businesses.

One of the programmes offered is the IBM Application Developer's Kit, available for free download on IBM's Linux site. The Kit is available to any commercial developers, and will be released to the educational community later.

"Linux is the critical component of evolution in e-business," said Melvyn Sum, software solutions manager for IBM ASEAN/South Asia.

Sum noted that 24% of all new servers and 65% of all ISPs (world-wide) were running on Linux last year. IBM was working with developers to meet the objective of making Linux the industry standard, he said.

The bundle was launched to assist developers kick-start development of Linux applications, said Sum. Part of the strategy is to offer feature developments on high-traffic sites, he added.

Last month, IBM contributed to support the open source community effort to develop an entreprise-class journaling file system (JFS) for Linux. Also last month, IBM announced the first available speech recognition technology for Linux (ViaVoice) which allows developers to create voice-enabled applications.