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Intel

Intel is one heavyweight difficult to bring down, despite fervent and highly-publicized attempts by its rivals to do so.The computer chip giant made a few stumbles over the past year, and allowed rival AMD to successfully encroach on its turf in the x86 and PC server market.

Intel is one heavyweight difficult to bring down, despite fervent and highly-publicized attempts by its rivals to do so.

The computer chip giant made a few stumbles over the past year, and allowed rival AMD to successfully encroach on its turf in the x86 and PC server market. AMD has also engaged the chipmaker in what is likely to be a long and drawn-out court battle.

In its complaint, AMD claimed that Intel imposed scare tactics and coercion on companies such as large-scale computer makers, wholesale distributors and retailers.

Just how valid is AMD's antitrust suit remains to be seen, but the uproar created in the process has neither stopped Intel from growing market share nor dampened its fight-back tactics.

To ensure that it does not lose more ground to AMD, Intel announced a 64-bit Celeron chip for mainstream PCs in June, a month ahead of its rival. It also launched its first dual-core server processor in October, which is to be followed by a higher-end dual-core model at the end of the year.

Intel has also scored a few triumphs with prominent system makers. On June 6, Apple announced its decision to switch from IBM processors to Intel in its Mac machines in the beginning of 2006.

In September, BlackBerry manufacturer Research in Motion said it will be using Intel-designed chips. The first Intel-based Blackberry devices are expected to be out in the market before the end of 2005.

For FY 2004, Intel posted revenues of US$34.2 billion, up 13.5 percent from the previous year.