Intel Developer Forum in pictures

From concept PCs and mobile phones to fuel cells, wireless USB and motes, the Intel Developer Forum had it all this week, and we were there to capture the best of the action

The Intel Developer Forum is the chip giant's chance to show off its latest ideas to its army of supporters, partners and independent designers. It's about more than just chip sets — wireless, virtual reality, fuel cells and new ideas in portable technology battle it out with dozens of new ideas for the attention and imagination of the people who make the industry work.

If you couldn't make it to San Francisco this week, then here are some of the things that made us sit up and take notice.

A Community PC



A Community PC - that's the computer, not the large gentleman in black guarding it. The PC is designed for rural developing markets, to be a shared resource for hundreds. It can run for hours from a car battery - power supplies are notoriously unreliable - and has a front-panel button that restores the entire computer to a known good state, essential when you don't have an IT specialist for five hundred miles. I'd like one of those buttons, please

Concept handtop PCs



A selection of concept handtop PCs, which combine full PC functionality with a PDA-like form factor. Now you too can run XP in a box small enough to lose down the back of the sofa. Rejoice

A DVB-H adaptor for digital television on the move



A DVB-H adaptor for digital television on the move. UK company Crown Castle is one of the big names behind this new standard, which promises 16 channels delivered wirelessly to PDA or laptop

An experimental home diagnostic unit



An experimental home diagnostic unit for Alzheimer's and other neurological conditions. It brings together a variety of tests that can monitor the progress of a patient with far more accuracy and currency than the normal system of visiting a clinic once every few months

A prototype portable doctor's assistant



Intel's digital heath division created this prototype portable doctor's assistant. The round knob in the top right hand corner is a wireless detachable Bluetooth stethoscope, while the three modules at the base customise the unit for different tasks

A wireless USB device



Wireless USB is still very, very wiry and not what you might call finished

The Itanium buzz



Itanium continues to generate a buzz unmatched by any other part of IDF

The Intel Developer Forum is the chip giant's chance to show off its latest ideas to its army of supporters, partners and independent designers. It's about more than just chip sets — wireless, virtual reality, fuel cells and new ideas in portable technology battle it out with dozens of new ideas for the attention and imagination of the people who make the industry work.

If you couldn't make it to San Francisco this week, then here are some of the things that made us sit up and take notice.

An experimental ultraportable video player running Windows CE

An experimental ultraportable video player running Windows CE



An experimental ultraportable video player running Windows CE

A prototype mobile phone



Alan Crouch, Intel, holds up a prototype mobile phone that combines four different wireless standards - Bluetooth, GPS, CDMA and Wi-Fi

A prototype mobile phone



A closer look at the prototype mobile phone that combines four different wireless standards - Bluetooth, GPS, CDMA and Wi-Fi

Another prototype mobile phone

Another prototype mobile phone



Another prototype mobile phone that combines four different wireless standards — this time Bluetooth, GPS, GPRS and Wi-Fi

The Intel Developer Forum is the chip giant's chance to show off its latest ideas to its army of supporters, partners and independent designers. It's about more than just chip sets — wireless, virtual reality, fuel cells and new ideas in portable technology battle it out with dozens of new ideas for the attention and imagination of the people who make the industry work.

If you couldn't make it to San Francisco this week, then here are some of the things that made us sit up and take notice.

A selection of Intel Motes



A selection of Intel Motes, independent sensor-laden wireless computers

An Intel Mote



An Intel Mote, showing how options can be stacked on nesting boards

More motes



More motes

ZDNet UK's mobile phone connects to an Intel Mote



ZDNet UK's mobile phone connects to an Intel Mote via Bluetooth - true cross-platform data connectivity

New optical communications



Although optronics isn't being featured heavily this year, Intel continues to invent new optical communications ideas. Here, three 10 gigabit/second modulators show that you don't have to be square to be hip

A three-dimensional virtual reality projection device



A three-dimensional virtual reality projection device -- shown here helping to model a project management plan -- tries hard not to look like a cross between a giant illuminated urinal and a satellite TV dish

The Intel Developer Forum is the chip giant's chance to show off its latest ideas to its army of supporters, partners and independent designers. It's about more than just chip sets — wireless, virtual reality, fuel cells and new ideas in portable technology battle it out with dozens of new ideas for the attention and imagination of the people who make the industry work.

If you couldn't make it to San Francisco this week, then here are some of the things that made us sit up and take notice.

A prototype Toshiba fuel cell



Toshiba's prototype fuel cell converts methanol directly to electricity, carbon dioxide and water and produces around thirteen watts for about ten hours

A prototype Toshiba fuel cell

A prototype Toshiba fuel cell



Toshiba's methanol fuel cell, due for production in 2007. Honest. The cell is the big block behind the laptop, the cartridges in the foreground contain enough juice to keep the computer going for around ten hours

A prototype fuel cell



One of two fuel cells on display, a prototype was shown working and powering a laptop - courtesy of a secret catalyser that runs at nearly 300 degrees centigrade. Production is due in a year's time, and the booth inhabitants were most upset when it was pointed out that, for fuel cells, production is always in a year's time