iPhone X is priced even higher in Korea

The 256GB model for the iPhone X is priced at 1.63 million won (around $1,450), even higher than the price tag in the US.

iPhone X: Nine can't-miss new features Here is a look of at some of the most anticipated features of Apple's new flagship, the iPhone X. Read more: http://zd.net/2yLTE0B

Apple has announced the pricing in South Korea for the soon-to-be-launched iPhone X, the most expensive yet in the series.

The 64GB model of the 10th anniversary iPhone will cost 1.42 million won ($1,270), while the 256GB will cost 1.63 million won ($1,450), the firm announced via its Korean homepage.

They cost $999 and $1,149 in the US, respectively.

A launch date for Korea has been not set, however. The global launch date for the phone is December 3.

In Australia, the phone carries a similar high price tag. Buying the iPhone X outright from Apple will set Australians back AU$1,579 for the 64GB model or AU$1,829 for 256GB. Sales begin there on Wednesday, November 3.

iPhone X's main competitor, Samsung's Galaxy Note 8, costs 1.09 million won for the 64GB model and 1.25 million won for the 256GB model -- around $980 and $1120, respectively.

iPhone 8, which begins official sales in Korea on Wednesday, costs 946,000 won for the 64GB model and 1.14 million won for the 256GB. The larger-screened iPhone 8 Plus costs 1.07 million won for 64GB and 1.28 million won for 256GB.

Pre-ordering customers for iPhone 8 has been low, according to local telco officials, most likely due to them waiting for the iPhone X.

PREVIOUS AND RELATED COVERAGE

    iPhone X or iPhone 8? Price, size, camera all factor in your buying decision

    Should you spend the extra bucks on an X, or is an iPhone 8 or 8 Plus good enough? Here's how to decide.

    iPhone X screen: Here's how much it will cost to repair

    Don't drop your iPhone X: Without AppleCare warranty, repairing the all-screen device will set you back $279. Other damages out of warranty will cost $549.

    Apple: We screwed up your iPhone X order, please come back

    Perhaps the best thing the company can do in the wake of a total ordering catastrophe is the unthinkable: Apologize.