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Is Android secure enough for mission-critical government and military use? (Exclusive video)

ZDNet Government's David Gewirtz takes a deep dive into military and government Android security with Dell's top Android security expert.
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Written by David Gewirtz, Distinguished Lecturer on

A few weeks ago, I published an article entitled Making Android secure enough for secure government work.

In it, I recounted some scary stories about government smartphone usage, and then explored some (very smart) work being done to make Android-based smartphones secure enough for government work.

The nice folks at Dell, who are working on this project, reached out to me and I had the opportunity to sit down with Neal Foster, Dell's Executive Director of Mobility Solutions Development for a deep dive into Android security, government smartphone usage, and some insider secrets about how to harden Android for military use.

Here's that discussion. It's absolutely fascinating. Before you watch it, I'd like to send a shout-out of thanks to both Neal and his associate Scott Radcliffe, who were both incredibly helpful, patient, and tolerant as we got the bugs worked out of our second-ever Skype Studio interview.

And now, here's Neal and Android security.

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