Is your location just a tax deal?

Where they move depends on what they're doing, and what kind of space they need. Tax deals don't enter into it. Access to knowledge, and people, matters more. Or does it?

Dollar signWhere will you site your medical technology company?

Most people site where they live. Thus it's important to have large research institutions in cities which want to attract medical start-ups.

But many ambitious towns have other strategies. One of the early stories here was of a New York entrepreneur whose real estate development was predicated on attracting medical suppliers as tenants.

And today there's word of Frisco, Texas seeing medicine as a real estate deal, launching a bond-backed construction project aimed at attracting "the next great medical company."

I can certainly envision Frisco attracting players from closer to Dallas, but can they draw from outside the region? I don't think so.

And talking about how you love entrepreneurs, or how those who get will keep, doesn't matter that much to those who don't have. Not if they're any good.

I based this on some knowledge of how Atlanta has grown its medical sector. Most companies start off close to Emory University or Georgia Tech, then move out to either I-285 or a suburb such as Kennesaw or Alpharetta.

Where they move depends on what they're doing, and what kind of space they need. If you need research offices you're going to stay closer to town, where researchers tend to live. Sales offices require quick freeway and airport access. Warehouse and manufacturing need cheap rents, and room to grow.

Tax deals don't enter into it. Access to knowledge, and people, matters more.

Or does it?

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