MasterChef suffers IT skills shortage

MasterChef Australia is experiencing an IT skills shortage after Melbourne IT tech support worker Mat Beyer was forced to step down from the show.

MasterChef Australia is experiencing an IT skills shortage after Melbourne IT tech support worker Mat Beyer was forced to step down from the show.

Mat Beyer

Mat Beyer
(Credit: Network Ten)

Beyer was caught "smuggling a smartphone, with activated internet and phone capabilities" into the MasterChef house.

Beyer said that he had the phone for six weeks before being found out by production staff.

"I think it was the wrong thing to do, and I think it was a rash decision, but I made a stupid mistake and I guess I'm paying for it now," Beyer said in a statement.

Smartphones and internet access are taboo for contestants, because they could use the devices to find information and get an advantage over other contestants.

All of the participants in the competition had been told the rules repeatedly, according to competition judge Matt Preston.

"We have to be fair to all the contestants, which is why it was decided that the only thing to do was to let Mat make a honourable withdrawal from the competition. Myself, George and Gary wish Mat all the best for the future, and hope that he will continue to pursue his dream of finding a future in food," he said.

The television show brought back web designer Billy Law from elimination to replace the disgraced Beyer, so luckily there is one representative from the IT industry still on the show to plug the gap.

The other contestants' jobs range from nurse to mum, journalist, professional lifeguard and film projectionist.

The IT industry has been the source for MasterChef winners in the past. In the first MasterChef show, Julie Goodwin, who helped her husband run business network support company Loyal I.T. Solutions, took out the crown in 2009.