Mixing column and paragraph formats

By default, Word's normal template is set to single-column format; thus, when you type a paragraph, you are typing in single-column format.

Microsoft Word
Mixing column and paragraph formats

By default, Word's normal template is set to single-column format; thus, when you type a paragraph, you are typing in single-column format.

You can mix column with paragraph formats in the same document by simply changing the column format.

For example, you may want to have your document open with an introductory paragraph or two, while the rest of the text is formatted in three columns. To do this, follow these steps:

  1. Type the opening paragraphs.
  2. Put your cursor where you want to begin the multi-column text.
  3. Go to Format | Columns.
  4. Enter 3 for the Number Of Columns, and make any necessary changes to Width And Spacing.
  5. In the Apply To drop-down menu, select This Point Forward.
  6. Click OK.

To add a paragraph below your multi-column text, click where you want the paragraph to begin, go to Format | Columns and change the number of columns to 1. Then, in the Apply To drop-down menu select This Point Forward and Click OK.

Microsoft Excel


Add the Watch Window toolbar

IT pros often use Excel worksheets to track what happens to a certain cell when changes are made to other cells.

Pre-Excel 2002, if the cell you were monitoring moved off the screen when you made a change to another cell, you would have to scroll back and forth between the cells to see the results. With Excel 2002, you can add a Watch Window, which keeps the value of the monitored cell on the screen--no matter where the change is made.

Follow these steps to add the Watch Window toolbar:

  1. Go to View | Toolbars | Watch Window.
  2. Click Add Watch in the Watch Window toolbar.
  3. Enter the cell you want to track and click the Add button.
  4. Repeat steps two and three for each cell you want to monitor.

As changes are made to the spreadsheet, the Watch Window toolbar will display the current value of the cells you are tracking.

Microsoft Access


Create an AutoLookup query

You can reduce typing time by basing your Access forms on AutoLookup queries.

For example, let's say you need to develop an Order form that includes fields from both the Customers table and Orders table. Rather than creating the form from these tables, you can base the form on an AutoLookup query that will automatically fill in the customer information once the CustomerID is entered.

Follow these steps to create an AutoLookup query:

  1. Create a new query with the Customers and Orders tables.
  2. Drag the CustomerID field (that joins both tables) from the Orders table to the query design grid.
  3. From the Customers table, drag the fields you want to be filled in by the query, such as Name and Billing Address fields.
  4. Add additional fields needed from the Orders table.
  5. After running and testing the query, create an Order-entry form based on this query.
When the user enters the CustomerID to enter a new order, Access automatically fills in the data from the Customers table.