Motorola

These days, you'd probably know Motorola from its slender clamshell Razr V3 mobile phone, or for introducing the world's first commercial handheld cellular phone, the Motorola DynaTAC, in 1983.But, more than just a mobile phone maker, the Chicago-based company is also a major developer of wireless, broadband and automotive communications technologies.

These days, you'd probably know Motorola from its slender clamshell Razr V3 mobile phone, or for introducing the world's first commercial handheld cellular phone, the Motorola DynaTAC, in 1983.

But, more than just a mobile phone maker, the Chicago-based company is also a major developer of wireless, broadband and automotive communications technologies. It is a key supplier of embedded systems for portable electronic devices and industrial equipment.

The company was founded in 1928 as Galvin Manufacturing Corporation, with assets worth US$565 in cash and US$750 in tools. In its latest fiscal year, ended Dec. 31, 2004, Motorola chalked up US$31.3 billion in revenues and US$10.5 billion in net income.

The company today has four core businesses delivering networks, connected home solutions, government and enterprise mobility solutions, and mobile devices. Among its wide range of products and services, Motorola designs and manufactures telematics systems, wireless subscriber and server equipment, and wireline access technologies.

It recently inked an agreement with Microsoft to develop its emergency services software tools using Microsoft Visual Studio .Net 2003 and Windows Server.

Motorola also upped its investment in Asia earlier this year with the opening of two research and development centers in India and Taiwan. The company also provided a two-way communications system that was used in the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens.

Earlier this year, the Motorola TETRA digital radio system was deployed by transshipment hub PSA Singapore Terminals, to manage shipping container traffic in the island-state.