Rumours fly on Trenchcoat Mafia's Web activity

Numerous press reports have linked the alleged gunmen in Tuesday's high school massacre in Colorado to the Internet, but most of the stories cannot be confirmed.

Police obtained search warrants for the homes of Columbine High School students Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold, later removing computers. Harris and Klebold, believed to be members of a group called "the Trenchcoat Mafia," are suspected of killing 15 fellow students before taking their own lives.

Investigators may find clues on the computers, such as whether the two students purchased guns online, or how they might have made the 30 explosive devices used in Tuesday's crime.

Authorities are releasing little information about the case, and they have not confirmed the following reports:

MSNBC and CNN reported that Harris had an America Online website that included photographs of the Trenchcoat Mafia, as well as recipes for making pipe bombs and references to the neo-Nazi movement. AOL also would not confirm the site's existence.

ABC News claims to have captured a screen shot of a chat room dedicated to the Trenchcoat Mafia that includes profiles of the groups associates and a "hit list" of its targets. ZDTV has not determined the legitimacy of this claim, or when it may have been posted relative to the shooting.

Messages were posted on a Deja News discussion group claiming to know inside information concerning the shootings. The messages are believed to be hoaxes.

Reuters reported that researchers at the Los Angeles-based Simon Wiesenthal Center said they downloaded an Internet file belonging to Harris in which he talked about how easy it was to make pipe bombs, saying, "Pipes are about as easy to purchase as a CD." The file went into elaborate details on how to make the bombs and what kind of powder to use.

The bodies of Harris and Klebold were found in the school library on Tuesday. Authorities believe they shot themselves.

ZDTV's own investigation is continuing. We will bring you updates on clues about how the suspects may have used online communication and technology.