SK Telecom opens developer platform for AI speaker

SK Telecom has opened a developers' website to invite third parties to develop services for its AI speaker NUGU.

SK Telecom has opened up access for developers to write services for its artificial intelligence (AI) speaker NUGU.

NUGU Developers will allow anybody to design services without the need to know how to code, the telecommunications carrier claimed.

Services will go through a review process to see whether it will overheat devices, or whether the service contains profanities, before it is rolled out to NUGU users.

The telco is hoping its AI platform will wider application beyond the home, and expand into shopping, security, entertainment, health, and education.

SK Telecom said it will also publish an SDK for its AI platform at a later date.

The telco first launched the speaker in 2016, and claims it has secured 6 million active users since then.

It has rolled out the speaker in convenience stores for use by clerks.

Chat giant Kakao, which has its own speaker dubbed the Kakao Mini, also allows for developers to create new services.

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