Splunk acquires machine learning and security company Caspida

Similar to its new parent company, the Palo Alto, Calif.-based startup specializes in machine learning while crunching behavioral analytics.

Splunk is bolstering its cybersecurity resources with the acquisition of Caspida.

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Similar to its new parent company, the Palo Alto, Calif.-based startup specializes in machine learning while crunching behavioral analytics.

Caspida then dives deeper into security with automatic threat detection across multiple channels and gateways, such as mobile endpoints, Software-as-a-Service solutions, corporate networks -- basically anywhere touched by the cloud.

"Most of these threats are hard to detect using traditional signature and rule-based approaches because they usually employ trusted access owned by insiders or gained from compromised credentials or systems," reflected Splunk CEO Godfrey Sullivan in a blog post.

Splunk plans to use Caspida's software and integrate it into its own behavioral analytics portfolio to serve up out-of-the-box type products to enterprise customers.

Honing in on data science and improved incident responsiveness, the product is promised to include anomaly detection and resolution across user, device and traffic applications.

Release dates for these integrations have not been announced yet.

"With Caspida, Splunk accelerates its focus on solving advanced threats - both external and from insiders - by shining a light on those who are wrongfully using valid credentials to freely and unpredictably exploit systems they have accessed," added Haiyan Song, senior vice president of security markets at Splunk, in Thursday's announcement.

Splunk has agreed to pay roughly $190 million for all outstanding Caspida stock, breaking down to approximately $127 million in cash and $63 million in restricted Splunk securities.

The purchase will make a dent on Splunk's balance sheet for the year. Splunk's chief financial officer Dave Conte noted the expense will be absorbed this year with the goal of contributing to sales next year.

However, Conte reaffirmed Splunk's current fiscal 2016 revenue and earnings expectations regardless of the acquisition.