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Innovation

Telstra very softly launches two-plan Belong ISP

The new ISP offers 70GB and 250GB plans for residents of metropolitan NSW in select locations.
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Written by Chris Duckett, Contributor on

Telstra has quietly launched a new internet service provider (ISP) called Belong that is offering a choice of two ADSL+ plans: A 70GB plan that costs AU$50 per month, and a larger 250GB plan for AU$65 per month. Availability on the new ISP is currently restricted to customers that have an existing phone line with Telstra and live in select locations in metropolitan NSW.

The ISP offers its plans with no lock-in contracts, counts all uploads and downloads toward the monthly quota, and shapes connection speeds down to 256Kbps once the quota is reached. Belong offers users an extra 5GB of quota for every six months that customers stay with the service.

Belong's existence was first noticed by TMWatch, which pointed out that Telstra has filed trademarks for the service in the same week that it filed trademarks for its new Muru-D startup incubator.

With the collapse of Telstra's takeover of Adam Internet in July this year following an inability to get Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) approval, it was widely expected that the giant Australian telco would launch a low-cost ISP outside of its BigPond brand.

Adam Internet eventually ended up in the hands of iiNet in a deal with AU$60 million.

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