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Too much glare when you look at your cameraphone photos? Could be a thing of the past

Yesterday at CES, chip-maker Qualcomm's subsidiary Qualcomm MEMS Technologies, Inc. made a series of announcements that IMHO will do no less than revolutionize image quality factors on mobile devices.
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Written by Russell Shaw on

Yesterday at CES, chip-maker Qualcomm's subsidiary Qualcomm MEMS Technologies, Inc. made a series of announcements that IMHO will do no less than revolutionize image quality factors on mobile devices.

At first blush, the announcement of Qualcomm MEMS teaming up with communications device manufacturer Foxlink Group for a "leading-edge watch design" sounds kind of peripheral. But when we talk about the product's mirasol display, we then can grasp the potential here.

Mirasol displays require no battery-sucking backlighting. They work by reflecting light so that specific wavelengths interfere with each other to create color.

The real confluence, it seems to me, will be when mirasol technology is used to boost the display quality of pictures taken with the same device.

Let's bring this to a practical perspective. You're outside, and have taken some pictures of a flower, a family picnic, even your best bud. You look at the photo in the camera. Nothing is wrong with the photo, but then there's glare from the sun.

Mirasol will diminish these issues by sharply increasing the clarity of your mobile device's photos.

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