Top iOS news of the week: Tracking iPhones, Apple Pay activations, iPhones most profitable

This week in iOS came reports of Apple looking at tracking iPhones when turned off, and analysts chiming in about Apple Watch and Apple Pay,

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Find your iPhone when powered off

A new patent by Apple aims to help find your iPhone even when it's turned off. When the owner uses the Find My iPhone app to locate a missing iPhone, it would trigger a low-power event on the phone when powered down to pinpoint the location.

This may raise privacy concerns that the phone is always tracking its current location, but it should make many iPhone owners feel more secure.

Source: The Independent

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Outrageous rumor: Apple Watch to have 100,000 apps at launch

Apple is expencted to go to market in April with the Apple Watch. The company has shown off various apps running on the Apple Watch, and is courting developers to write them.

An analyst has predicted that a whopping 100,000 Apple Watch apps will be available when it comes available, and 42 million watches will be purchased this year. That prediction falls in the "take it with a grain of salt" category. A very large grain at that.

Source: Cultofmac

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Apple takes 89 percent of smartphone profits world-wide

Android may own a major chunk of global smartphone market share, but iOS dominates where it matters. Strategy Analytics reports that Apple made almost 89 percent of all profits in the smartphone sector in Q4 of 2014.

The $18.8 billion in profit for the quarter was due to the strong sales of the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus. Android OEMs collectively only made $2.4 billion in profits.

Source: ZDNet

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Chase has activated a million Apple Pay accounts

Apple Pay continues to gain ground in the mobile payment space, and Chase Bank is doing its part. The bank stated it has activated a million Apple Pay accounts since the service launched.

Of particular interest is that Chase found that Apple Pay users are younger and make more money that its average customer.

Source: 9to5mac