Use Dynamic DNS to update client host records

Windows 2000 Server and Windows Server 2003 both include a feature called Dynamic Domain Name Systems (DDNS), which enables the server to automatically update host (A) and pointer (PTR) records for client computers.

Windows 2000 Professional
Use Dynamic DNS to update client host records

Windows 2000 Server and Windows Server 2003 both include a feature called Dynamic Domain Name Systems (DDNS), which enables the server to automatically update host (A) and pointer (PTR) records for client computers.

When you close the Event Viewer, the filter settings that you have set in the current session are discarded. When you open the Event Viewer again, the Event Viewer shows all events for all dates.

Windows 2000 and later clients can directly request updates of their records, while the server can update records for other clients, such as those running Windows 98.

DDNS makes it possible to maintain accurate client host records in DNS even when those clients take their IP addresses from DHCP. You configure DDNS at the client side through the TCP/IP properties for a network interface.

Follow these steps:

  1. Open the Network And Dial-Up Connections folder, right-click an interface, and choose Properties.
  2. Select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and click Properties.
  3. Click Advanced on the General tab to open the Advanced TCP/IP Settings dialog box.

Windows 2000 Server


Get to know the Windows Scripting Host

If you're relatively new to administrating Windows Server 2000, you might not realize that you have a powerful scripting tool at your disposal. This tool can help you automate administrative tasks such as backups, user administration, and more.

Windows Server 2000 includes the Windows Scripting Host (WSH). WSH supports scripts written in VBScript, which is very similar to Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), and Jscript, loosely modeled on the Java programming language.

But don't make the mistake of thinking WSH's uses stop at relatively simple tasks. In fact, it features a broad range of capabilities to automate processes, extract information from the system, and even provide management functions through Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP).

Of course, learning to use scripts takes time and an affinity for programming. To get an idea of WSH, here's a simple script to help you get your feet wet. Enter the following into a text file, save it as Hello.vbs, and double-click the new file to execute it:

dim user, computer, sh
set sh = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.Network")
user = sh.UserName
computer = sh.ComputerName
msgbox "Hello, " & user & vbCrLf & "Logged on from " & computer