What's a Pligg worth?

Pligg, an open source Digg clone, has put itself on the market. For a minimum bid of $25,000 on Sedo.Com, you and your friends or business partners can get the domain name, the Web site, and access to the Sourceforge domain where the software is located.

Pligg logo
Pligg, an open source Digg clone, has put itself on the market.

For a minimum bid of $25,000 on Sedo.Com, you and your friends or business partners can get the domain name, the Web site, and admin access to the Sourceforge address where the software is located.

Pligg is an open source CMS which has 10,000 registered users and almost 800,000 Yahoo links, according to URLTrends. Mashable says 3 Pligg sites are submitted to it each day, and that Automattic, the commercial arm of Wordpress, is a valid business.

Not everyone is thrilled, according to comments at Techcrunch. One called it a theft of intellectual property from Digg. (Pligg has already faced similar charges from Supergu.)

Another notes that the CMS itself is not for sale. A third notes that other projects, like Drupal, already have CMS features.

The Pligg admins say they all have day jobs and the task of managing a community of 10,000 has become too much. They expect the sale to take several months, and seem to hope for jobs or cash.

Seems fair. But as the "open source for sale" trend continues to roll on, what does this mean for users? If you've used Pligg, are you worried?

And what would you plunk for a Pligg, anyway? How do you set a price for Pligg? What are the metrics? Comments from VCs and other experts are especially welcome here.