What's right (and wrong) with the iPhone 6s/6s Plus

Apple has unveiled the new iPhone and in a few days it will kick off the pre-order process. That means that the Cupertino giant thinks that we have all the information we need to pull the trigger in an iPhone 6S or iPhone 6S Plus.

Apple has unveiled the new iPhone and in a few days it will kick off the pre-order process. That means that the Cupertino giant thinks that we have all the information we need to pull the trigger in an iPhone 6S or iPhone 6S Plus.

Let's take a look at what the new hardware has to offer

What's right with the iPhone 6S and iPhone 6S Plus:

  • Sticking with the same look, so existing accessories will still work.
  • Faster processor and graphics though the march of Moore's law.
  • Better camera and some new photography tweaks (such as Live Photo).
  • Stronger structure through the use of 7000-series aluminum and stronger glass.
  • 3D Touch gives iOS a new feature to the iOS user interface.
  • Improved Touch ID sensor.
  • New rose gold finish (for those who like that sort of thing).
  • Pricing structure remains the same.

What's wrong with the iPhone 6S and iPhone 6S Plus:

  • If you were hoping for something that looked different, you better be happy with the new "S" on the box.
  • Improvements seem more like tiny evolutionary increments than serious improvements. No single killer feature stood out at the launch.
  • 16GB model remains, despite the fact that 16GBs of storage is only suited to the lightest of users.
  • The 12-megapixel camera is an improvement, but 12 megapixels are hardly groundbreaking.
  • No return of an iPhone with a 4-inch display.
  • No wireless charging.
  • No waterproofing such as that found in premium Android handsets.

The bottom line:

While some questions remain over whether Apple can shift as many iPhone 6S and 6S Plus handsets as it did iPhone 6/6 Plus, there's no doubt that Apple will sell tens of millions. Also, these new handsets are more aimed at users who haven't upgraded for two or three years. For them, the delights that the 6S has to offer will be more appealing and seem like a bigger tech leap.

To me, it looks like the iPhone has entered the maintenance phase of its lifecycle, and that from now on Apple is going to be relying more on leveraging the hardware than making spectacular hardware leaps.

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