White House taps VMware exec Tony Scott as next U.S. CIO

Scott has more than three decades of experience in the technology industry -- not to mention the role of CIO pops up several times on his resumé.

After a headhunting search spanning several months, the Obama Administration has found a new U.S. chief information officer.

The White House announced on Thursday that it will be hiring Tony Scott, currently chief information officer and senior vice president at VMware, to fill the void.

Scott has more than three decades of experience in the technology industry -- not to mention the role of CIO pops up several times on his resumé.

Scott joined VMware in 2013 to oversee the virtualization company's global information technology group.

Prior to VMware, Scott served as chief information officer at both Microsoft and The Walt Disney Company.

Scott also served as chief technology officer, overseeing information systems and services, at General Motors.

The role of CIO at the federal government level is a relatively new one.

Vivek Kundra was the first one to hold the job after being appointed in 2009. However, he resigned within two years for a new position as a joint fellow at the Kennedy School and the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard.

Kundra was then followed by Steven VanRoekel, the country's second CIO who left his position in September to serve in the same capacity at the humanitarian organization USAID.

Since VanRoekel's departure, a few names for the job circulating speculative reports included Dr. David Bray, CIO of the FCC, and Dr. Alissa Johnson, Deputy CIO of the White House.

As noted by ZDNet's Michael Krigsman last fall, the U.S. CIO stands in the unique position of being a national policy leader as well as an operational executive overseeing an IT budget nearing $80 million.