Larry Dignan

Larry Dignan is Editor in Chief of ZDNet and Editorial Director of ZDNet's sister site TechRepublic. He was most recently Executive Editor of News and Blogs at ZDNet. Prior to that he was executive news editor at eWeek and news editor at Baseline. He also served as the East Coast news editor and finance editor at CNET News.com. Larry has covered the technology and financial services industry since 1995, publishing articles in WallStreetWeek.com, Inter@ctive Week, The New York Times, and Financial Planning magazine. He's a graduate of the Columbia School of Journalism and the University of Delaware.

Zack Whittaker

Zack Whittaker is the security editor for ZDNet. You can send tips securely via Signal and WhatsApp to 646-755-8849, and his PGP fingerprint for email is: 4D0E 92F2 E36A EC51 DAAE 5D97 CB8C 15FA EB6C EEA5.

Stephanie Condon

Stephanie Condon is a staff writer for CBS Interactive based in Portland, Oregon, covering business technology for ZDNet. She previously covered politics for CBSNews.com, as well as the intersection of technology and politics for CNET. Stephanie graduated with a B.A. in communication from Stanford University.

Latest Posts

Example of how PCs will give way to specialized appliances

Example of how PCs will give way to specialized appliances

Dovetailing my blog post from yesterday about why an Intel acquisition of Nvidia makes sense (answer: appliance innovators need a flexible platform that's not a PC motherboard that gets them 95 percent of the way "there"), this post gives an example of the sort of appliance I was thinking about.

October 6, 2006 by in PCs

About that supposedly legal MP3 download site in Russia....

About that supposedly legal MP3 download site in Russia....

Back when I first started complaining about how a 99 cent song (purchased at the iTunes Music Store) couldn't be played back on my $20,000 whole-home entertainment system (a shining example of the problem with DRM technology), a bunch of people suggested that I could legally buy music that would work from a Russian-based source of unprotected MP3 files called AllofMP3.com.

October 5, 2006 by in Legal

The Business of Changing The World: Corporate Philanthropy

The Business of Changing The World: Corporate Philanthropy

Last night I attended a dinner to celebrate the release of The Business of Changing The World: Twenty Great Leaders on Strategic Corporate Philanthropy, a book by salesforce.com's Marc Benioff (written with Carlye Adler) that covers corporate philanthropy, with essays by Michael Dell, Craig Barrett (Intel), Mike Eskew (UPS), Jean-Pierre Garnier (GlaxoSmithKline), Phil Marineau (Levi Strauss), Steve Case (AOL) and a dozen other executives.

October 5, 2006 by in Salesforce.com

The Attention Gang prepares for a land grab

The Attention Gang prepares for a land grab

Fellow ZDNet blogger Denise Howell and I went to an AttentionTrust luncheon, where Michael Goldhaber decoded the concept of attention and Seth Goldstein and Steve Gillmor rolled out some AttentionTrust and GestureBank announcements. Denise covers Goldhaber's talk and the Goldstein/Gillmor announcements with her usual thoroughness.

October 5, 2006 by in Big Data Analytics

Dave Duffield sheds light on his Workday

Dave Duffield sheds light on his Workday

PeopleSoft founder Dave Duffield and friends have been working in their post-Oracle era on a new set of enterprise applications built from the ground up on modern technology--XML, SOA, Web services--to enable an "innovative core design." The Workday Web site has a preview, but it's more of a statement of position--no screenshots, test drives or other useful data.

October 4, 2006 by in Developer

Rx for IT failure: Cut off support from the corner office

Rx for IT failure: Cut off support from the corner office

Regarding Massachusetts' loss of two CIOs in a year, Michael Krigsman who authors a blog about software implementation failures (eeek, grim topic to be passionate about... more power to ya Mike) writes:These two embattled CIOs obviously believe that Massachusetts does not properly support the state’s strategic IT initiatives.

October 4, 2006 by in Tech Industry

On extra-sensory perception

On extra-sensory perception

Researchers at Hong Kong Polytechnic University have developed ultrasonically-enabled glasses and shoes designed to give the blind a set of "bat ears" that can detect obstacles and report them using varying levels of vibration. From the article: "The shoes will be able to detect steps, holes in the road and obstacles within a five cm (two inch) vertical distance.

October 4, 2006 by in Big Data Analytics

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