Larry Dignan

Larry Dignan is the former Editor in Chief of ZDNet. He was most recently Executive Editor of News and Blogs at ZDNet. Prior to that, he was executive news editor at eWeek and news editor at Baseline. He also served as the East Coast news editor and finance editor at CNET News.com. Larry has covered the technology and financial services industry since 1995, publishing articles in WallStreetWeek.com, Inter@ctive Week, The New York Times, and Financial Planning magazine. He's a graduate of the Columbia School of Journalism and the University of Delaware.

Stephanie Condon

Stephanie Condon is a staff writer for Red Ventures based in Portland, Oregon, covering business technology for ZDNet. She previously covered politics for CBSNews.com, as well as the intersection of technology and politics for CNET. Stephanie graduated with a B.A. in communication from Stanford University.

Natalie Gagliordi

Natalie Gagliordi is a senior writer for Red Ventures based in Louisville, Kentucky, covering business technology for ZDNet.

Latest Posts

Ballmer: We're not interested in Yahoo anymore

Ballmer: We're not interested in Yahoo anymore

Updated: Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer said the software giant has no intention of making a new offer for Yahoo--even though the Internet company is on sale relative to its first offer.Via ZDNet Australia (Techmeme)Speaking at a Committee for Economic Development of Australia (CEDA) lunch in Sydney today, Ballmer said: "Look, we made an offer, we made another offer.

November 6, 2008 by in Enterprise Software

AT&T adds value to iPhone with expanded Web connectivity

AT&T adds value to iPhone with expanded Web connectivity

One of the common themes at Dreamforce and Web 2.0 Summit, both in San Francisco this week, is that companies that add value to their products and services during this economic downturn are the ones that will be best-positioned when the country finally gets its finances back in order.

November 6, 2008 by in Mobility

YouTube: Does your video ID system really work?

YouTube: Does your video ID system really work?

It's been a little more than a year since YouTube announced the launch of its system to identify videos uploaded to its site that contained, without authorization, copyrighted content from television program and movie producers. And it won't be until next year that the $1 billion suit filed by Viacom that alleges continual infringement of its intellectual property by the video-sharing unit of Google gets heard in court.

November 5, 2008 by in Social Enterprise

Google's favorite penny stock: Nexicon

Google's favorite penny stock: Nexicon

Google is hoping to perfect YouTube's video identification system with the help of a company that hasn't filed financials with the Securities and Exchange Commission, has a convoluted history and is run by a self-proclaimed "natural born content pirate."And oh yeah this company--Nexicon--is a penny stock.

November 5, 2008 by in Google

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