Larry Dignan

Larry Dignan is Editor in Chief of ZDNet and Editorial Director of ZDNet's sister site TechRepublic. He was most recently Executive Editor of News and Blogs at ZDNet. Prior to that he was executive news editor at eWeek and news editor at Baseline. He also served as the East Coast news editor and finance editor at CNET News.com. Larry has covered the technology and financial services industry since 1995, publishing articles in WallStreetWeek.com, Inter@ctive Week, The New York Times, and Financial Planning magazine. He's a graduate of the Columbia School of Journalism and the University of Delaware.

Zack Whittaker

Zack Whittaker was the security editor for ZDNet.

Stephanie Condon

Stephanie Condon is a staff writer for CBS Interactive based in Portland, Oregon, covering business technology for ZDNet. She previously covered politics for CBSNews.com, as well as the intersection of technology and politics for CNET. Stephanie graduated with a B.A. in communication from Stanford University.

Latest Posts

MS competitors gather to fast track ODF's evolution

MS competitors gather to fast track ODF's evolution

Within days of OASIS' OpenDocument Format (ODF) suffering a political setback in Massachusetts (a drama which has yet to fully play itself out), many of Microsoft's competitors gathered in IBM-stronghold Armonk, NY on Friday, November 4 to plot the next steps for the fledgling XML-based document standard.  Because some of what was discussed was apparently confidential, the press was not invited to observe the ODF Summit.

November 9, 2005 by in Microsoft

Is RIM losing its edge?

Is RIM losing its edge?

There was a time, around three years ago, if you wanted to takeway my Research in Motion (RIM) BlackBerry from me, you would have had to pry it from my dead hands, or, as reality would have it, shut down my service.   I know many other people who felt and still feel the same way.

November 8, 2005 by in BlackBerry

Maybe search doesn't matter...maybe it does

Maybe search doesn't matter...maybe it does

Echoing his well known and much discussed and vilified "Harvard Business Review" essay "IT Doesn't Matter," Nick Carr writes at the end of a post on the commoditization of search that "maybe search doesn't matter." Nick posits that search from the big three isn't very differentiated, nor is it a major barrier to switching from one search engine to another.

November 8, 2005 by in Enterprise Software

Innovators bemoan near-sighted R&D

Innovators bemoan near-sighted R&D

Technology researchers and scientists gathered in New York City last week to honor two colleagues: Gordon Moore, co-founder of Intel, and Claude Berrou [at right], co-inventor of turbo codes. Berrou and several of the attendees at the Marconi Society-sponsored symposium added their voices to the growing concern that the United States is falling behind the rest of the world in technological innovation because fewer dollars are being allocated to long-term research.

November 8, 2005 by in Hardware

Coming up: The Searchers

Coming up: The Searchers

Not the famous John Ford movie, "The Searchers," but the SDForum's event, “The Search: A ten year perspective”, which takes place on Thursday night in Mountain View, CA. I'll be interviewing John Battelle, author of Searchblog and The Search, and get a look at some of the newer, specialized search engines that are popping up on the landscape.

November 7, 2005 by in Enterprise Software

MS-Office schema not as open source friendly as Microsoft says it is

MS-Office schema not as open source friendly as Microsoft says it is

When Alan Yates, Microsoft Information Worker Product Management Group business strategy general manager, first came to me to say that his company had been railroaded when Massachusetts voted the OpenDocument office file format (ODF) in, and Microsoft's Office XML Reference Schema (OXRS) out, one of his original arguments was that OXRS was getting a bad rap for not being implementable in open source software.

November 7, 2005 by in Open Source

Microsoft set to roll out 'longer twitch' products

Microsoft set to roll out 'longer twitch' products

A week after debuting its plan for iterating software products and services (Windows and Office Live) on a "fast twitch" cycle, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer will roll out the long twitch cycle products--Visual Studio 2005, SQL Server 2005 and BizTalk Server 2006--tomorrow in San Francisco.  To remind those of you unfamiliar with the notion to twitch cycles, here's how Ballmer explained Microsoft's product development strategy during an interview at Gartner's Symposium ITxpo last month.

November 6, 2005 by in Microsoft

Gordon Moore live from New York

Gordon Moore live from New York

Gordon Moore spoke at Marconi Award Event in New York City where he received the prestigious Marconi Lifetime Achievement Award. In the video clip Moore explains the origins of this forty-year-old observation, and now 'Law,' about the rate of computing innovation.

November 4, 2005 by in Hardware

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