Larry Dignan

Larry Dignan is Editor in Chief of ZDNet and Editorial Director of ZDNet's sister site TechRepublic. He was most recently Executive Editor of News and Blogs at ZDNet. Prior to that he was executive news editor at eWeek and news editor at Baseline. He also served as the East Coast news editor and finance editor at CNET News.com. Larry has covered the technology and financial services industry since 1995, publishing articles in WallStreetWeek.com, Inter@ctive Week, The New York Times, and Financial Planning magazine. He's a graduate of the Columbia School of Journalism and the University of Delaware.

Zack Whittaker

Zack Whittaker is the security editor for ZDNet. You can send tips securely via Signal and WhatsApp to 646-755-8849, and his PGP fingerprint for email is: 4D0E 92F2 E36A EC51 DAAE 5D97 CB8C 15FA EB6C EEA5.

Stephanie Condon

Stephanie Condon is a staff writer for CBS Interactive based in Portland, Oregon, covering business technology for ZDNet. She previously covered politics for CBSNews.com, as well as the intersection of technology and politics for CNET. Stephanie graduated with a B.A. in communication from Stanford University.

Latest Posts

Schwartz: Blogs are essential for leadership

Schwartz: Blogs are essential for leadership

During an interview with Supernova 2005 conference host Kevin Werbach, Sun President, COO and chief blogger Jonathan Schwartz called blogging essential for leadership. "If you want to be a leader, I can't see surviving without a blog.

June 21, 2005 by in Telcos

Does Microsoft know what IT shops really need?

Does Microsoft know what IT shops really need?

David Berlind's Feature heap won't undo LAMP's toll on Microsoft brings to mind the importance of understanding the client's needs. The Microsoft juggernaut came about, in large part, because Bill Gates envisioned a one-stop-shopping model by which the consumer could go to one vendor and buy one product (a PC configured with Windows and Office) and meet 95% of the their needs.

June 21, 2005 by in Enterprise Software

How to pick a BlackBerry

How to pick a BlackBerry

I'm beginning to notice more and more BlackBerry 7100s showing up in the hands of mobile warriors.  For example, by carrying the latest and greatest, I was always on the leading edge compared to the rest of the family, often drawing those coveted oohs and aahs.

June 20, 2005 by in Mobility

Microsoft XML technologies and patents drawing fire from multiple quarters

Microsoft XML technologies and patents drawing fire from multiple quarters

The recently announced XML-based file formats for Word, Excel, and PowerPoint -- formats that Microsoft has claimed to be "open" -- are getting some heat for not only pushing the boundaries on the definition of open, but also for the validity of the patents behind them.   In addition, the patents behind other Microsoft XML technologies are under heavy scrutiny as well.

June 20, 2005 by in Legal

Predictions for JavaOne, anyone?

Predictions for JavaOne, anyone?

I just got done reading Sun president and COO Jonathan Schwartz's most recent blog entry, most of which describes the business model that put Red Hat on the map with Linux -- but that does so in the context of Sun's recently released OpenSolaris and how, by crossing the digital divide, all technology boats will float a little higher.  Wrote Schwartz, "And I'd rather get 20% of a business that's planetary in scope, than 100% of a business with 17 customers.

June 17, 2005 by in Oracle

Dell: Put that MacOS in my pipe and let me smoke it

Dell: Put that MacOS in my pipe and let me smoke it

So, maybe I wasn't so crazy after all when, the other day, I suggested that Dell might now be the perfect company to resell systems loaded with Apple's OS X now that Apple is cutting bait with IBM's PowerPC and switching to Intel chips.  According to a report in Fortune Magazine, Dell founder Michael Dell said "If Apple decides to open the Mac OS to others, we would be happy to offer it to our customers.

June 17, 2005 by in Dell

Maybe now, Intel's Centrino will offer a technical advantage

Maybe now, Intel's Centrino will offer a technical advantage

For years, Intel and I have been at odds over advantages of going with a Centrino-enabled notebook versus a non-Centrino notebook.  I've argued that Centrino is nothing more than a package of Intel-only parts that has so far proven to be no more competent at connecting to and using WiFi networks than similar packages with some non-Intel parts (in particular, the Wi-Fi radio).

June 17, 2005 by in Intel

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