Larry Dignan

Larry Dignan is Editor in Chief of ZDNet and Editorial Director of ZDNet's sister site TechRepublic. He was most recently Executive Editor of News and Blogs at ZDNet. Prior to that he was executive news editor at eWeek and news editor at Baseline. He also served as the East Coast news editor and finance editor at CNET News.com. Larry has covered the technology and financial services industry since 1995, publishing articles in WallStreetWeek.com, Inter@ctive Week, The New York Times, and Financial Planning magazine. He's a graduate of the Columbia School of Journalism and the University of Delaware.

Zack Whittaker

Zack Whittaker is the security editor for ZDNet. You can send tips securely via Signal and WhatsApp to 646-755-8849, and his PGP fingerprint for email is: 4D0E 92F2 E36A EC51 DAAE 5D97 CB8C 15FA EB6C EEA5.

Stephanie Condon

Stephanie Condon is a staff writer for CBS Interactive based in Portland, Oregon, covering business technology for ZDNet. She previously covered politics for CBSNews.com, as well as the intersection of technology and politics for CNET. Stephanie graduated with a B.A. in communication from Stanford University.

Latest Posts

Jamie Lewis on the future of identity management

Jamie Lewis on the future of identity management

Jamie Lewis, Burton Group’s CEO and research chair, opened Digital ID World 2005 today with a densely packed keynote that gave context and perspective to where identity management is heading.  He first talked about trends and emphasized one of the core ideas of the conference, which is that regulatory compliance and automated provisioning are driving identity management adoption.

May 11, 2005 by in Security

What's wrong with keynote presentations

What's wrong with keynote presentations

Keynote sessions at most conferences come in two primary flavors--enlightening presentations from subject matter experts tuned to the audience and boring, generic corporate pitches from vendors who are conference sponsors (they contribute to the financial well being of the conference).

May 11, 2005 by in Security

The sorry state of  American telecom

The sorry state of American telecom

Thomas Bleha, recipient of an Abe Fellowship and a former Foreign Service officer in Japan for eight years, published an article in the May/June edition of Foreign Affairs where he warns America that its broadband and wireless technology failures could have high costs in the future due to lost opportunities for economic growth, increased productivity, and a better quality of life. (A recent News.

May 11, 2005 by in Networking

Is the bloom off the cellco WiFi hedge?

Is the bloom off the cellco WiFi hedge?

From Interop in Las Vegas last week, I wrote about how Intel went to the trouble of blanketing all of greater Las Vegas with a WiMax wireless network and how a local infrastucture provider (MPower Communications) picked up the tab so that the network would stay in place indefinitely.

May 10, 2005 by in Networking

Digital identity with a capital 'I'

Digital identity with a capital 'I'

I’m at Digital ID World 2005 conference in San Francisco. Phil Becker, editor in chief of Digital ID World and host of the event, kicked off the event defining his notion of digital identity, with a capital "I.

May 10, 2005 by in Security

On the joys of borrowed intelligence

On the joys of borrowed intelligence

There's a marvelous (probably apocryphal) story about a database vendor who was giving a sales pitch to a prospective customer's applications people, all of whom were assiduously taking notes on their PCs. The audience asked questions that got steadily more technical and abstruse until the sales reps found themselves (to their surprise and dismay) ineptly discussing the relative merits of static versus temporary tables.

May 10, 2005 by in Data Management

When programmers change their tune

When programmers change their tune

In past blog posts regarding the difficulties inherent in crossing programming domains (Unix to Windows, say), some claimed that programming is universal, and any decent programmer should be able to cross development boundaries as easily as crossing the street. If they can't then they are stupid and should be fired (someone did claim that).

May 9, 2005 by in Windows

Trumba calendars its service

Trumba calendars its service

As first reported in March, Trumba is an online calendaring application that lets people create, manage and share calendars over the Web (screenshot). Since mid-April, it has been available as a free beta, and bloggers like Alex Bosworth and David Ascher are test-driving it with overall positive results.

May 9, 2005 by in Developer

Intel on AMD's early dual-core wins: "Not so fast"

Intel on AMD's early dual-core wins: "Not so fast"

Updated: Literally and figuratively.Still smarting from having to swallow its pride over the success of AMD's 32/64 hybrid technology (AMD64), Intel appears once again to be on the short end of AMD's technological stick -- this time, over dual-core chip technology (the technology that basically packs two CPUs into one chip).

May 9, 2005 by in Processors

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