John Carroll

<p>John Carroll has programmed in a wide variety of computing domains, including servers, client PCs, mobile phones and even mainframes. His current specialties are C#, .NET, Java, WIN32/COM and C++, and he has applied those skills in everything from distributed web-based systems to embedded devices. In his spare time, he enjoys the world of digital video, and served as director of photography and editor on a feature-length film produced in Limerick, Ireland, as well as a low-budget production filmed in Los Angeles that used Panavision digital cameras (the same ones used by George Lucas in the later Star Wars episodes).</p> <p>John worked in Microsoft's Mediaroom division from May, 2005 to May, 2008. He is co-founder of <a href="http://www.forgetmenotafrica.com">ForgetMeNot Software</a>, a creator of unified messaging software targeted at telecommunications providers, where he currently works as Director of Technology.

Latest Posts

China and intellectual property

China and intellectual property

The June 27, 2005 issue of "Fortune" published an article asking when China will protect Intellectual Property (I found the article thanks to this commentary on The Register). The MPAA claims that 95% of DVDs and other recorded entertainment sold in China are pirated.

June 30, 2005 by in China

Defending creators of digital media

Defending creators of digital media

I wasn't disappointed by the recent Supreme Court ruling that allowed content owners to sue file trading networks for failure to do enough to protect their copyrights. That shouldn't surprise anyone who caught my post last week where I defended content owners against the "fair use" militias who want to force them not to package their products in ways that would help to prevent file trading in the first place (namely, with Digital Rights Management (DRM) that restricts the way media can be used).

June 28, 2005 by in Legal

The art of programming

The art of programming

I'm sick of Tom Cruise. I have an instinctive dislike for people who swing the articles of their faith around like some mad Viking descending on a fog-shrouded Irish village.

June 26, 2005 by in Developer

Property rights and the broadcast flag

Property rights and the broadcast flag

Joe Brockmeier recently castigated members of Congress for attempting to sneak the broadcast flag into law by attaching it to an appropriations bill. Along the way, Joe agreed with Rick Boucher, representative for Virginia's Ninth Congressional district, that if the content industry wants the broadcast flag, they should agree to legal extensions into the digital age of "fair use" principles.

June 22, 2005 by in Legal

The benefits of patents

The benefits of patents

Richard Stallman doesn't like the proposed EU directive which would legalize software patents in the European Union. That's not surprising, because the software libre movement he founded and the software license, the GPL, he wrote aim to remove all entanglements from the software development process, whether based on a secret (proprietary source code) or on patented algorithms.

June 21, 2005 by in Legal

Einstein's credibility

Einstein's credibility

At age 37, Albert Einstein put the finishing touches on General Relativity. That accomplishment, combined with Special Relativity, would have been reason to spend the rest of his life on a Greek Island drinking Ouzo and playing badminton.

June 16, 2005 by in Tech Industry

Raymond on open source

Raymond on open source

If you talk to Eric Raymond or Richard Stallman, they make very specific that "open source" (which is Eric Raymond's bailiwick) is not "free software" (Stallman's domain). "Open source" is more pragmatic, concentrating on the benefits of the "open" development model over proprietary models.

June 16, 2005 by in Open Source

Cultivating corporate schizophrenia

Cultivating corporate schizophrenia

Judge Motz, chief judge of the United States District Court for the District of Maryland, narrowed the scope of Novell's ongoing antitrust case, throwing out four of the six claims on technicalities (they weren't filed within proper timeframes). The last two were allowed to continue, and all the news reports -- including Ina Fried reporting for News.

June 13, 2005 by in Microsoft

Microsoft juggernauts and antitrust

Microsoft juggernauts and antitrust

David Berlind has been writing a fascinating series of blog posts on the "Microsoft media juggernaut." In case you missed them, you can see them here (first, second, third, fourth, and fifth, my apologies if I missed some).

June 9, 2005 by in Microsoft

Outsourcing: tempest in a teapot

Outsourcing: tempest in a teapot

Outsourcing is still a topic that can turn your typical American programmer into a fan of import protections. It's perfectly understandable, as we're talking livelihoods, and all the economic theory in the world won't keep the electricity on or pay high LA mortgage rates (which is why I won't be buying a house anytime soon).

June 3, 2005 by in CXO

Open Source's debt to corporations

Open Source's debt to corporations

Jesus Villasante, the head of software technologies at the EC's Information Society and Media Directorate General (try saying that after a few beers), accused American IT companies of using open source programmers to their own nefarious ends. Companies are using the potential of communities as subcontractors--the open-source community today (is a) subcontractor of American multinationals I think Mr.

May 31, 2005 by in Open Source