David Gewirtz

In addition to hosting the ZDNet Government and ZDNet DIY-IT blogs, CBS Interactive's Distinguished Lecturer David Gewirtz is an author, U.S. policy advisor and computer scientist. He is featured in The History Channel special The President's Book of Secrets, is one of America's foremost cyber-security experts, and is a top expert on saving and creating jobs. He is also director of the U.S. Strategic Perspective Institute as well as the founder of ZATZ Publishing. David is a member of FBI InfraGard, the Cyberwarfare Advisor for the International Association for Counterterrorism & Security Professionals, a columnist for The Journal of Counterterrorism and Homeland Security, and has been a regular CNN contributor, and a guest commentator for the Nieman Watchdog of the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University. He is the author of Where Have All the Emails Gone?, the definitive study of email in the White House, as well as How To Save Jobs and The Flexible Enterprise, the classic book that served as a foundation for today's agile business movement.

Latest Posts

Reducing the cost of health care

Reducing the cost of health care

At the May meeting of the National Association of State CIOs, HHS Secretary Mike Leavitt had some bad news about Medicaid: "Medicaid expenditures will exceed public education expenditures for the first time this year. If health care begins to push out all other priorities, it throws off the economic equation.

June 28, 2005 by in Enterprise Software

The Supremes Rule Against Grokster

The Supremes Rule Against Grokster

The Supreme Court, in a unanimous decision this morning, ruled that "One who distributes a device with the object of promoting its use to infringe copyright ... is liable for the resulting acts of infringement by third parties using the device, regardless of the device's lawful uses.

June 27, 2005 by in Legal

Can your IT shop compete?

Can your IT shop compete?

Last week, I decided I wanted a new Moto Razr cell phone. I could have taken my purchasing card down to the Cingular store and gotten one that night, but I decided I'd play by the rules.

June 16, 2005 by in Mobility

Staying out of the news

Staying out of the news

It seems like every week now there's a story about another company losing control of digital identity data. The problem, of course, is that when your identity data is lost by some company, the chances that your identity will be stolen go up.

June 13, 2005 by in Data Centers

InfoCard and Web Services

InfoCard and Web Services

Over at the IT Garage, Doc Searls goes through some history of Microsoft's InfoCard initiative and asks some good questions.  InfoCard is an identity metasystem that Doc correctly describes as a "barn raising project" led by Microsoft.

June 6, 2005 by in Networking

Tools for IT Transparency

Tools for IT Transparency

Much of the mistrust that occurs between the business and IT sides of an organization is founded on misunderstanding and questions about resources.  Consequently, building a successful IT organization requires a culture of transparency.

June 2, 2005 by in CXO

Does Your CEO Trust You?

Does Your CEO Trust You?

The Bain & Co. "Management Tools and Trends 2005" survey asks some rather pointed questions of IT and business managers regarding the relationship between these two groups.

May 31, 2005 by in CXO

The reality of Web services

The reality of Web services

Andrew McAfee, an associate professor in the technology and operations management unit at Harvard Business School, has been studying who uses Web services and why. More interesting, perhaps, are his insights into why using Web services remains hard.

May 23, 2005 by in Networking

Long live COBOL?

Long live COBOL?

Search390 reports the results of a Micro Focus survey on mainframes and COBOL.  According to the survey, COBOL is still the dominant language on mainframe computers and the median age of COBOL programmers is 45-59.

May 20, 2005 by in Tech & Work

Semantic web looking for the killer app

Semantic web looking for the killer app

Tim Berners-Lee continues to preach the gospel of the semantic web.  Speaking at the Fourth Annual Bio-IT World Conference and Expo in Boston, Berners-Lee discussed how the semantic web could solve problems in the life sciences: Life scientists in particular could find the Semantic Web a useful tool and in so doing "provide leadership to lots of other fields" in implementing this next-generation Web technology, Berners-Lee said.

May 20, 2005 by in Enterprise Software

The Graying of IT

The Graying of IT

A recent story in Baseline Magazine discusses what CIOs at various companies are doing to retain institutional knowledge in the face of retiring IT workers.  One example, FirstEnergy Corp: As its first baby boomers turn 60 next year, FirstEnergy Corp.

May 16, 2005 by in Open Source

Remixing Google Maps

Remixing Google Maps

The other day, someone asked me: "do you know of a mapping service on the Internet that shows you drive times as a set of contour lines from a particular location?" I said I didn't, but someone could probably code it up in an hour or two on top of Google Maps.

May 5, 2005 by in Google

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