Mitch Ratcliffe

Mitch Ratcliffe is a veteran journalist, media executive and entrepreneur. He was editor of the ground-breaking Digital Media newsletter in the 1990s and a frequent contributor to ZDNet over the years. He led development of the first Web audio/video news network at ON24, sat on the board of Electric Classifieds Inc. and Match.com, and worked as an investment banker. A dedicated "portfolio career" worker, Mitch is co-founder and Chief Scientist of BuzzLogic LLC, a social network analytics and marketing communications platform developer, and works with Audible Inc. on its podcasting service, among other projects detailed <a href="http://www.ratcliffe.com/ disclosure.htm">here</a>. </p>

Latest Posts

Erosion of privacy is a corporate strategy

Erosion of privacy is a corporate strategy

CNET reports on Google's efforts to expose Google Reader user's shared items to Google Talk contacts.The article compares this to the Facebook Beacon project, which would have made purchases and other personal preferences available to people who are Facebook friends.

December 27, 2007 by in CXO

We will all miss Marc

We will all miss Marc

Rest in Peace Marc OrchantIt was only a few weeks ago that Marc Orchant and I were exchanging mail about his new gig with the David Allen Company, and planning to meet this past week at one of Buzz Bruggeman's amazing dinners. It's an incredible tragedy, one no one could have expected of such a warm and engaged person, that today would be Marc's last.

December 9, 2007 by in Tech & Work

Google: Does it have to be all FUD all the time?

Google: Does it have to be all FUD all the time?

Fear, uncertainty and doubt (FUD--see Wikipedia) is how IBM tried to retain its dominance, what Microsoft used to cement its monopoly and, now, I suggest we review recent Google news and wonder:Industry Leaders Announce Open Platform for Mobile Devices: In which Google and "a broad alliance of leading technology and wireless companies today joined forces to announce the development of Android, the first truly open and comprehensive platform for mobile devices.

November 5, 2007 by in Social Enterprise

"User-centric" starts with the social, not the commercial

"User-centric" starts with the social, not the commercial

I'm on a bit of a tear today, but it is because I just got over a week of Percodan-induced drooling after I had some surgery on my aging shoulder. I don't know if it is just that I am coherent for the first time since last Friday or that got my teeth into this VRM thing in a way that I'm finally able to explain....

October 11, 2007 by in Banking

Making sense of VRM

Making sense of VRM

For many months, I have been reading the Project VRM list hosted by Doc Searls and Harvard. The putative Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web has addressed this challenge, as well, but misses in ways similar to VRM, because of the implicit relationships between social web service providers and their customers.

October 11, 2007 by in Tech & Work

We're all swimming in media now

We're all swimming in media now

William Gibson, "Father of Cyberpunk," long known for his prescience, has put his finger on a fundamental truth about the world we live in today. His new book, Spook Country, contains a couple passages everyone concerned with media business models should read and consider (along with the rest of the book, which is a pretty good yarn about the hidden currents of American paranoia).

September 6, 2007 by in Networking

Put the lid on Quechup

Put the lid on Quechup

In recent days, I've received a half dozen invitations to join Quechup (it gets no linkage because it deserves none), which is billed as "the social networking platform sweeping the globe." Turns out it the service is more like a cancer than a popular uprising, because it is spamming the address books of people who are fooled into joining.

September 4, 2007 by in Social Enterprise

What is an authentic community?

What is an authentic community?

My old friend and cofounder at BuzzLogic, Todd Parsons, has posted about the need to connect financial incentive to blogging activity, calling it an "an army on the rise":Despite its image, Pay Per Post is gathering steam and the reason is, for many individual publishers out there, the personal satisfaction they get from blogging is not always enough. The numbers tell us that many want to take their self-publishing efforts to another level and generate revenue, no matter how small.

August 31, 2007 by in Tech Industry

Top Stories