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AWS intros Snowball Edge devices with EC2 instances

Amazon's Snowball Edge devices let customers analyze data or run a custom app in a remote location.

Snowflake's cloud data warehouse is now available on Azure

Video: Snowflake's cloud data warehouse is now available on Azure

Amazon Web Services' Snowball Edge devices can now run a local version of Amazon EC2 compute instances, the company said Tuesday.

Amazon's Snowball Edge devices let customers analyze data or run a custom app in a remote location.

Read also: Amazon AI: Cheat sheet - TechRepublic

The device can run virtualized applications at the edge in the same way it's done in the cloud, but without having to get the data back to the cloud to process it. The devices are then shipped to AWS, where the data is migrated to the cloud for storage, aggregation, and analysis.

Read also: AWS adds streaming algorithms to SageMaker machine learning platform

With the addition of local EC2 instances, Amazon said the devices can operate in even more hostile work environments with limited or non-existent Internet connections. The devices also have expanded on-board compute and storage capabilities with AWS Greengrass running AWS Lambda functions and Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3).

The Snowball Edge announcement was made at the ongoing AWS Summit in New York, where the tech giant also introduced the Z1d instance, which is a system that aims to be the "fastest in the public cloud."

Read also: Amazon AI: Cheat sheet - TechRepublic

AWS also outlined R5/R5d instances designed to provide better price-per-gigabyte performance for in-memory caches, database and big data.

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