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RSA Conference moves 2021 event from February to May

RSA plays it safe for 2021 after ignoring COVID-19 warnings earlier this year and getting at least two attendees infected.
By Catalin Cimpanu, Contributor on

The organizers of the RSA cyber-security conference have announced this week plans to reschedule next year's event, citing public health and safety concerns brought on by the current global coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

"RSA Conference has elected to move its 2021 event from February to the week of May 17, 2021," said Linda Gray Martin, Sr. Director & General Manager for the RSA Conference.

"The physical event will remain in San Francisco at the Moscone Center and will be accompanied by a robust and innovative virtual experience."

The RSA Conference is one of the top 3 most attended and most popular cyber-security conferences of the year, along with Black Hat and DEF CON.

The conference has historically held its event at the end of February and start of March.

Earlier this year, RSA organizers came under heavy criticism after they chose to hold the 2020 event at the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, and despite many similar tech and security conferences canceling, postponing, or moving events to a virtual format.

At least two attendees tested positive after attending the event.

The RSA Asia Pacific & Japan 2020 event will be held this summer, between July 15 and July 17 in a virtual format.

Black Hat and DEF CON have announced earlier this month plans to cancel their in-person events for August 2020 and also go with a virtual format, where conference talks are streamed live across the internet. DEF CON organizers said they wouldn't charge participants to attend this year's live streams.

RSA organizers said they haven't hashed out exact plans for next year's event, but promised to be transparent in future communications as plans unfold.

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