Eileen Yu

Senior Contributing Editor

Eileen Yu began covering the IT industry when Asynchronous Transfer Mode was still hip and e-commerce was the new buzzword. Currently an independent business technology journalist and content specialist based in Singapore, she has over 20 years of industry experience with various publications including ZDNet, IDG, and Singapore Press Holdings. Eileen majored in Journalism at The University of Queensland, Australia, where she wrote an honours thesis titled: To Censor or Not: The Great Singapore Dilemma. In her By The Way blog, she covers industry developments in Singapore as well as other Asian markets, and aims to drive discussions about the impact of government regulations and policies.

Eileen Yu has no shares-related information to disclose as she doesn't hold investments in the organisations she covers. Acceptance of fees related to her freelance projects does not constitute an endorsement of the company and will not influence her coverage of the company. She is not sponsored by any company or under any exclusive contract.

Latest from Eileen Yu

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S'pore goes high on TV

S'pore goes high on TV

Singapore's Media Development Authority CIO Yeo Chun Cheng discusses hurdles the media regulator had to cross when the country kicked off its high-definition television trials in May 2006.

April 2, 2007 by in Tech & Work

Plugging Asia's IT skills gap

Plugging Asia's IT skills gap

Skills shortage is a perennial issue, both for the IT industry and businesses looking for in-house technical expertise. According to Hudson's latest report, the lack of candidates with the right skill sets is the No.

November 2, 2006 by in Tech & Work

How should one's IT skills be valued?

How should one's IT skills be valued?

I attended a roundtable dialogue earlier this week to discuss how we can encourage IT organizations in Singapore to employ autistic workers.Last year, we featured a Danish computer company Specialisterne which hires and trains people with autism, specifically those diagnosed with high-functioning autism, so these individuals can serve as IT consultants and be a useful member of the general workforce.

June 28, 2012 by in Tech & Work