Simon Bisson

Freelance journalist

Born on the Channel Island of Jersey, Simon moved to the UK to attend the University of Bath where he studied electrical and electronic engineering. Since then a varied career has included being part of the team building the world's first solid state 30KW HF radio transmitter, writing electromagnetic modelling software for railguns, and testing the first ADSL equipment in the UK. He also built one the UK's first national ISPs, before spending several years developing architectures for large online services for many major brands. For the last decade he's been a freelance writer, specialising in enterprise technologies and development. He works with his wife and writing partner Mary Branscombe from a small house in south west London, or from anywhere there's a WiFi signal and a place for a laptop.

Latest from Simon Bisson

Show search filters
How to open the OneNote cache file

How to open the OneNote cache file

EverNote is great for using on smartphones but for keeping track of anything and everything on my PC, I love OneNote. I can write on my tablet screen and have my handwriting recognised, I can record audio that's time-synced to my typed notes, I can clip in sections of Web pages or dialog boxes I want to use as screen grabs, I can print in documents to annotate...

July 30, 2010 by in Windows

Oh Google…

Oh Google…

Whimsy is all very well, when your obsession with irrational numbers gets you headlines about the Nortel patent auction by making your losing bid pi billion dollars. But perhaps there are more important things for Google to do than amuse the world?

July 5, 2011 by in Windows

Navigating with Windows Phone, turn by turn

Navigating with Windows Phone, turn by turn

Before Windows Phone 7 came out, we repeatedly asked Microsoft if app developers would be able to create turn-by-turn GPS navigation apps - not only are they useful (we drive everywhere in the US and UK using CoPilot, now on iPhone instead of Windows Mobile) but they're a good test of how much access to the platform a developer gets.

June 22, 2011 by in Windows

What Chromebooks really mean for Windows

What Chromebooks really mean for Windows

For businesses, Chromebooks aren't about what you get - they're about what's left out. The knee jerk response is 'the operating system' (it's Linux underneath but you'll never see it) but the omission that appealed to most of the businesses talking up Chromebooks at Google IO is complexity.

May 16, 2011 by in Windows

Chromebooks for business: more details

Chromebooks for business: more details

If you've read what Google's Rajen Sheth had to say about Chromebooks for business, you may be interested in some extra details he gave us about how the monthly subscription scheme will work - and some colourful ways he found of explaining what Google sees as the advantage of a Chromebook.What would happen if a business wanted to cancel the three year contract?

May 24, 2011 by in Windows