Andrew Nusca

Former editor

Andrew Nusca is a former writer-editor for ZDNet and contributor to CNET. He is also the former editor of SmartPlanet, ZDNet's sister site about innovation. He writes about business, technology and design now but used to cover finance, fashion and culture. He was an intern at Money, Men's Vogue, Popular Mechanics and the New York Daily News. He is a graduate of New York University and Columbia University. He also happens to be a reformed rock drummer who digs food, cities, words and neckties. He is based in New York.

Andrew Nusca does not hold any investments in the companies he covers.

Latest from Andrew Nusca

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Tweet: Google to buy Brightcove for $500 to $700 million

Tweet: Google to buy Brightcove for $500 to $700 million

Google is in talks to buy Web video provider Brightcove for $500 million to $700 million, says PBS MediaShift editor Mark Glaser on Twitter, citing a source with knowledge of the deal.The move marries the consumer video power of Google's YouTube with the commercial video prowess of Brightcove.

September 16, 2009 by in Google

Google reveals secret server hardware

Google reveals secret server hardware

Google for the first time on Wednesday revealed the hardware at the core of its Internet operations at a conference about the increasingly prominent issue of data center efficiency, reports CNET's Stephen Shankland.Instead of buying hardware from companies such as Dell, Hewlett-Packard, IBM, or Sun Microsystems, Google designs and builds its own.

April 2, 2009 by in Google

Google triggers annoying DoS CAPTCHA prompt?

Google triggers annoying DoS CAPTCHA prompt?

Twice today during work -- from the confines of Google Chrome, no less -- I've been prompted, while logged into Google, with a denial-of-service notice stating the following:We're sorry, but your query looks similar to automated requests from a computer virus or spyware application. To protect our users, we can't process your request right now.

February 23, 2009 by in Google

Audio CAPTCHAs easy to crack, according to researchers

Audio CAPTCHAs easy to crack, according to researchers

A great story over at Ars Technica today details the efforts of the Carnegie-Mellon University team behind the reCAPTCHA service, who has turned its attention to the audio CAPTCHAs used by the visually impaired.These audio CAPTCHAs consist of a string of spoken characters, typically masked and distorted by a form of background noise.

December 8, 2008 by in Google