Dion Hinchcliffe

Contributor

Dion Hinchcliffe is an expert in information technology, business strategy, and next-generation enterprises. He is currently VP and Principal Analyst at Constellation Research as well as Chief Strategy Officer at 7Summits. A veteran of enterprise IT, Dion has been working for two decades with leading-edge methods to bridge the widening gap between business and technology. He has extensive practical experience with enterprise technologies and he consults, advises, and writes prolifically on social business, IT, and enterprise architecture. Dion still works in the trenches with clients in the Fortune 1000, government, and Internet startup community. He is also a sought-after keynote speaker and is co-author of several books on 2.0 subjects including Web 2.0 Architectures from O'Reilly as well as the best-selling Social Business By Design from John Wiley & Sons (May, 2012.)

Dion's Current and Past Clients: AIIM, AOL, Alcatel-Lucent, Best Buy, CBS Interactive, JackBe ING, Intuit, Microsoft, Nexplore, Qualcomm, T. Rowe Price, Techweb, The World Bank, 1105 Media Reply Italy, O'Reilly Media, LG CNS, LMI, Accenture, 2BeWise, 4Sports LLC, Gucci, IBM, Incubeta, Kapow Technologies, Mansueto Digital, Near-Time, nGenera, Swisscom, Sys-Con, Viscape, Coca-Cola, McKinsey & Company, Hasbro, CDW, IDG

Latest from Dion Hinchcliffe

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Consumers as producers: Disintermediation without a net

Consumers as producers: Disintermediation without a net

Most of you know that I've been tracking closely the inversion of control seemingly being ushered in en masse by the Web. That the interesting parts of the Web are increasingly contributed by its users directly, or indirectly, apparently establishing that the sheer mass of innovation is in control of the greater Web community rather than by a few centrally controlled outlets. The implications for business seems to be that control over a lot of things is moving from top-down to bottom-up, or at least heading in one particular direction instead of the other.

July 18, 2006 by in Enterprise Software

Finding Web 2.0

Finding Web 2.0

First, a parable: At the heart of the Web from the very beginning was the concept of sharing information with others. Originally this vision encompassed the notion of information stored in "pages" accessible from the network and connected together by links. These links let readers effortlessly travel to related information somewhere else on the Internet, forming a sort of fabric. This conceptual fabric was of a relatively flat "Web" of servers and pages with hyperlinks gluing everything together. And though creating pages could be done by anybody, in practice it was done by a relative few. But early on, everyone liked what they saw and built on top of it.

September 14, 2006 by in Enterprise Software

Information portability, trust, and an Online Software 'Bill of Rights'

Information portability, trust, and an Online Software 'Bill of Rights'

The online social software services like del.icio.us let us do a remarkable thing. They create another good reason to store our data online for all to share. I can't tell you how many times I've made terrific discoveries because of del.icio.us/popular or Blinklist. And then added those discoveries to my own bookmarks, further increasing the public pool of knowledge. These relevance engines really do make excellent use of the data that we publicly conglomerate on these types of sites. The point here is that the value of software and data online is often much greater than the value of software and information offline.

March 6, 2006 by in Enterprise Software

Online Ajax "desktops" try to change the rules of the game

Online Ajax "desktops" try to change the rules of the game

As the Web matures into a richly intertwined ecosystem of shared content and open services, what some call The Web As Platform, some innovative companies are beginning to offer potentially disruptive products that leverage the Web's growing "platformness". Increasing in popularity in particular are what some people call Ajax desktops, or personalized start pages.

February 12, 2006 by in Enterprise Software

Can technology improve business innovation?

Can technology improve business innovation?

Useful innovation is one of the most meaningful outputs of human creativity. Today, technological aids are increasingly employed to improve and amplify the innovation process. Now new social methods, especially crowdsourcing, have fundamentally altered how innovation is achieved and even who does it.

November 30, 2013 by in Enterprise Software

The social Web in 2010: The emerging standards and technologies to watch

The social Web in 2010: The emerging standards and technologies to watch

The emergence of Facebook, Twitter, and the rest of the social Web as a global force in the last several years has done a great deal to highlight their potential to fundamentally alter the way we communicate and collaborate both at home and in business. However, despite the movement of social computing into our daily lives we're all clearly on a long journey together as the technologies themselves emerge from infancy.The state-of-the-art today when it comes to the social computing environments that surround us now -- in our browsers, mobile devices, and elsewhere -- underscore how much more we have left to do to make these new modes of digital conversation and discourse become mature, efficient, safe, and truly useful.Fortunately the Web doesn't stand still and there continues continues to be rapid research and development when it comes to the mechanics of today's online social universe. There are many new efforts under way to refine and improve the world of social media, some of which we'll explore here and many which are just beginning...

January 20, 2010 by in Enterprise Software

The Facebook imperative for enterprise software

The Facebook imperative for enterprise software

Marc Benioff, CEO of Salesforce, the well-known CRM and cloud computing company (and now soon-to-be social software vendor) wrote a guest post on TechCrunch late last week making the case for “why enterprise software should take its cues from Facebook and become more social.” What then does this mean for the future of IT and what impacts will social computing ultimately have on the enterprise.

February 28, 2010 by in Enterprise Software

Why social business is different - Part 1: Reusing stored collaboration

Why social business is different - Part 1: Reusing stored collaboration

Enterprise social media is often touted as a more modern and capable way of communicating that is inherently more open and transparent. Yet it's the ability of these tools to keep collaborative alive and thriving over time that provides much of the value to businesses looking to retain worker knowledge, train up new hires, and get the level of reuse that they ought to from their hard-won organizational experience.

April 25, 2011 by in Enterprise Software