Dion Hinchcliffe

Contributor

Dion Hinchcliffe is an expert in information technology, business strategy, and next-generation enterprises. He is currently VP and Principal Analyst at Constellation Research as well as Chief Strategy Officer at 7Summits. A veteran of enterprise IT, Dion has been working for two decades with leading-edge methods to bridge the widening gap between business and technology. He has extensive practical experience with enterprise technologies and he consults, advises, and writes prolifically on social business, IT, and enterprise architecture. Dion still works in the trenches with clients in the Fortune 1000, government, and Internet startup community. He is also a sought-after keynote speaker and is co-author of several books on 2.0 subjects including Web 2.0 Architectures from O'Reilly as well as the best-selling Social Business By Design from John Wiley & Sons (May, 2012.)

Dion's Current and Past Clients: AIIM, AOL, Alcatel-Lucent, Best Buy, CBS Interactive, JackBe ING, Intuit, Microsoft, Nexplore, Qualcomm, T. Rowe Price, Techweb, The World Bank, 1105 Media Reply Italy, O'Reilly Media, LG CNS, LMI, Accenture, 2BeWise, 4Sports LLC, Gucci, IBM, Incubeta, Kapow Technologies, Mansueto Digital, Near-Time, nGenera, Swisscom, Sys-Con, Viscape, Coca-Cola, McKinsey & Company, Hasbro, CDW, IDG

Latest from Dion Hinchcliffe

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Exploiting the power of enterprise wikis

Exploiting the power of enterprise wikis

As part of my recent exploration of developing strategies for using Web 2.0 in the enterprise, I find that time and again the lowly wiki presents itself as the most likely target for the initial adoption in the enterprise. For one thing, almost everyone has heard of a wiki, that Web page that anyone authorized to can edit at the push of a button, all without knowing even a smidgen of HTML.

May 7, 2006 by in Social Enterprise

When the worlds of SOA and Web 2.0 collide

When the worlds of SOA and Web 2.0 collide

Noted business and IT forward-thinker John Hagel wrote a detailed piece yesterday about what he calls the "highly dysfunctional gap" between SOA and Web 2.0. And it's true, there are few worlds in the IT industry that seem more opposite from each other, yet are more strangely intertwined, than SOA and Web 2.0. What will happen?

April 26, 2006 by in Social Enterprise

SPARK and MIX: Bounding the future of the Web

SPARK and MIX: Bounding the future of the Web

The last few days here at SPARK and MIX 06 have been a miniature version of the whirlwind of forces that are remaking and reshaping the Web today. Setting the stage for the week was SPARK, Microsoft's workshop on the future of software architecture. With an emphasis on the convergence of Web 2.0, Software as a Service (SaaS), and Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA), the event brought together 28 of the top people in IT architecture to brainstorm about the near-term future direction of software architecture.

March 21, 2006 by in Social Enterprise

Outlook on software in 2006: Healthy, disruptive

Outlook on software in 2006: Healthy, disruptive

An increasing amount of attention is being given to the new Software 2006 Industry Report from the respected Mckinsey and Company (along with the Sandhill group). The report is a high level look at the overall state of the software industry and is chock full of interesting and informative tidbits. You can read it for yourself as they have kindly made it available online in PDF form. Some of information isn't too surprising, namely that we're just now fully recovering from Bubble 1.0 and that software is increasingly moving online. Others are more bold and include...

April 10, 2006 by in Social Enterprise

Enterprise mashups: More about processes and less about services?

Enterprise mashups: More about processes and less about services?

A pair of excellently written and well-reasoned new posts over the last couple of days have focused on a key issue when weaving pre-existing services together into useful new business applications. The result of doing this is often called a composite application in the "enterprisey" world of service-oriented architecture (SOA). And it's called a mashup in the primarily consumer world of Web 2.0. Regardless of name however, both composite apps and mashups are intended to reduce the overall effort of development, improve functionality, promote data consistency, and increase the net output of useful software.

August 14, 2006 by in Social Enterprise

Repeating history, The Long Tail, and software demand

Repeating history, The Long Tail, and software demand

Peter Rip of Leapfrog Ventures did a really good take recently on what Web 2.0 will look like in the enterprise. I bring your attention to it because it brings out a few essential points and almost makes a few others I think are still missing in the larger industry conversation about Web 2.0 and its increasing push into the enterprise.

June 1, 2006 by in Social Enterprise

Blogs, wikis, and Web 2.0 as the next application platform

Blogs, wikis, and Web 2.0 as the next application platform

My previous post discussed how IBM is planning to use Web 2.0 software like wikis as a foundation upon which to build so-called situational software. These are instant applications which can be assembled just-in-time (and not created from scratch) from the rich pallette of services and feeds available on the Web and in the enterprise. They are situational because they can be created right as the situation they are needed for appears, and even thrown away when the reason for their existence goes away.

June 20, 2006 by in Social Enterprise

Does every organization need a Web 2.0 strategy?

Does every organization need a Web 2.0 strategy?

I read with interest this morning Gartner's new 2006 Emerging Technologies Hype Cycle which they released earlier today. Of course, I wasn't too terribly surprised to find that Web 2.0 figured prominently at the top of the list. Released yearly, the list identifies and analyzes the most hyped new technology trends. I find the Hype Cycle to be both good reading as well as a useful reality check. The report does make one thing clear; Web 2.0 will have significant business impact in the next half-decade and companies everywhere are having to consider directly how it affects them and their business strategies.

August 9, 2006 by in Social Enterprise