Ed Bott

Senior Contributing Editor

Ed Bott is an award-winning technology writer with more than two decades' experience writing for mainstream media outlets and online publications. He has served as editor of the U.S. edition of PC Computing and managing editor of PC World; both publications had monthly paid circulation in excess of 1 million during his tenure. He is the author of more than 25 books, including Windows 10 Inside Out (now in its 4th edition) and Windows 11 Inside Out (scheduled for publication in 2022).

Ed Bott is a freelance technology journalist and book author. All work that Ed does is on a contractual basis. Since 1994, Ed has written more than 25 books about Microsoft Windows and Office. Along with various co-authors, Ed is completely responsible for the content of the books he writes. As a key part of his contractual relationship with publishers, he gives them permission to print and distribute the content he writes and to pay him a royalty based on the actual sales of those books. Ed's books are currently distributed by Pearson Education under the Microsoft Press imprint. On occasion, Ed accepts consulting assignments. In recent years, he has worked as an expert witness in cases where his experience and his knowledge of Microsoft technology and licensing have been useful. In each such case, his compensation is on an hourly basis, and he is hired as a witness, not an advocate. Ed sometimes receives fees and/or travel expenses for live speeches and webinars from companies and organizations. Acceptance of these fees does not constitute an endorsement of the company's products. Ed does not own stock or have any financial interest in any technology company. Ed does not accept gifts from companies he covers. All hardware products he writes about are purchased with his own funds or are review units covered under formal loan agreements and are returned after the review is complete.

Latest from Ed Bott

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Another pirate?

Another pirate?

Microsoft says its WGA validation code is so accurate that it has produced only a "handful" of false positives. It's hard to take that claim seriously when one of the most widely read members of the Windows enthusiast community just got stung.

July 21, 2006 by in Microsoft

10 tough questions about Office 2007

10 tough questions about Office 2007

Led by its two poker-playing veterans, Microsoft is making a huge bet on Office 2007. Whether they win or lose depends on how customers respond to the massive changes in this version. I've put together a detailed look at the new Office and posed 10 questions that will tell whether Office is a big winner or a bust.

June 8, 2006 by in Microsoft

Apple, Google, Microsoft: Where does the money come from?

Apple, Google, Microsoft: Where does the money come from?

If you want to know why big tech companies act the way they do, follow the money. Based on the latest SEC filings, Apple's still a successful hardware company, and Google's still in the advertising business. Meanwhile, how's that "devices and services" shift working for Microsoft?

February 6, 2014 by in Microsoft

The Windows 7 name game, continued

The Windows 7 name game, continued

It is rare that you get to see a Microsoft executive tap dance and juggle at the same time, but that’s what I felt like as I read one senior executive's attempt to explain why the next version of Windows will be called Windows 7, even though it's technically version 6.1. Unfortunately, the “simple” explanation that follows fails spectacularly when you get to the part that jumps from 6 to 7. So what's really behind the name?

October 15, 2008 by in Microsoft

Six money-saving secrets to help stretch your tech budget

Six money-saving secrets to help stretch your tech budget

The recent collapse of worldwide financial markets has everyone on edge. If you’re like most people, tough times have you looking around at ways to cut back on spending. You might be tempted to impose a freeze on all new purchases of hardware and software, but that draconian strategy only works for so long. Sooner or later, you need to refresh old technology, either because it’s stopped working or is so slow that it’s cramping your productivity. A better strategy, in my experience, is learning to shop smarter. In today’s post, I share some of the secrets I’ve learned about how to get great PC hardware and software without breaking the bank.

October 12, 2008 by in Microsoft